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michael stone

michael stone

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Comments (3403)

  • Comment on: 'Patients need properly trained nursing staff'

    michael stone's comment 8 February, 2016 2:34 pm

    I've just discovered - initially causing me confusion - that there are several different 'versions' of that 'community nursing' document, although the theme is a constant (it isn't clear that the differences are 'update' - it seems to be several versions, released at the same time). Confusing to a simple chap like me !

  • Comment on: 'Patients need properly trained nursing staff'

    michael stone's comment 8 February, 2016 2:23 pm

    I've just tried the link I posted - it doesn't seem to work.

    You will find the document if you do a Google search for its title:

    District Nursing and General Practice Nursing Service: Education and Career Framework October 2015

    www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Interactive%20version%20of%20the%20framework_1.pdf

    I just pasted that into here, then into a browser window which did load the PDF.

  • Comment on: 'Patients need properly trained nursing staff'

    michael stone's comment 8 February, 2016 2:17 pm

    For ANONYMOUS6 FEBRUARY, 2016 8:48 AM

    What's the difference between an NA and AP?

    You can download a 'future of community nursing' PDF from:

    https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Interactive%20version%20of%20the%20framework_1.pdf

    A 'nursing associate' will be the most-qualified type of Health Care Assistant, and will for practical purposes 'sit immediately below the lowest 'tier' of registered nurse'.

    An Advanced Practitioner is the highest 'tier' of nursing (unless you include Nurse Consultant, which seems to be higher still).

    There is a list of roles/titles on page 28 which goes:

    1 Pre-employment
    2 Health Care Assistant
    3 Health Care Assistant
    4 Assistant Practitioner (called Nursing Associate in the NT piece)
    5 Community Staff Nurse
    6 District Nurse/Team Leader
    7 Senior District Nurse/Team Leader
    8 Advanced Community Nurse Practitioner

    No 4 in that list - this 'nursing associate' role - will require qualifications at about foundation degree level.

    Hope that helps - not sure if it will (and they keep changing the names !).

  • Comment on: 'Patients need properly trained nursing staff'

    michael stone's comment 8 February, 2016 11:13 am

    The consultation currently open asks what the 'label' should be for these 'nursing assistants'. There will also, I think, be 3 'grades' of what are currently termed HCAs if you include NAs.

    I will be suggesting to the consultation, that the current HCAs should all be called ''Descriptor' Care Worker - so HCAs would be 'Basic Care Worker', 'Intermediate [or perhaps Standard] Care Worker' and 'Senior Care Worker' (Senior Care Worker being the title for the 'nursing associate' role).

  • Comment on: Management style among nurses affects staff retention

    michael stone's comment 6 February, 2016 2:43 pm

    This does - as an outsider, with a rather cynical 'take' on some 'health research' - strike me as potentially a very useful thing to study. Of course, even if 'the evidence is there and clearly right', that doesn't mean that achieving the changes the evidence 'says would help' is easy !

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