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Nursing forum's four themes unveiled

The prime minister’s Nursing and Care Quality Forum will focus on four themes, including “values and culture”, it has emerged.

Deputy chief nursing officer for England David Foster outlined the four areas at a nursing workforce conference held last week in London. The themes are: “People first”, “values and culture”, “time to care” and “leadership”.

Mr Foster told delegates at the Reshaping the Nursing Workforce conference that the first two topics were also likely to be covered by recommendations from the final report of the Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust public inquiry, which is expected at the end of May or early June.

He added: “It’s really important to recognise that places like [Mid Staffordshire] can be rehabilitated and improved over time, but it does require strong leadership from the top, at board level.”

Mr Foster also stressed the need for better leadership at ward sister level and said this needed to be prioritised by boards. But he rejected the argument that nurses were not caring for patients properly because they were too well educated.

Launching the forum last month, David Cameron said he wanted the NHS Institute’s productive ward initiative to be rolled out nationally, alongside a “red-tape challenge” to identify barriers to preventing nurses from doing their job properly and remove them.

In addition, hourly nursing rounds would be systematically implemented and the “NHS Safety Thermometer” tool would be introduced to track four key standards of safety and nursing quality – pressure ulcers, falls, blood clots and catheter-acquired urinary tract infections.

Meanwhile, the Department of Health confirmed it had delayed the first meeting of the forum, which was due to take place last Friday but was cancelled at late notice.

The DH said it was because the membership of the group had not been finalised – a reason for this has not been given. The DH now hopes to hold the first meeting in mid March.

Readers' comments (6)

  • What's new eh!

    Making sure that this happens is the key and I don't mean performance targets and tick boxes...... I mean:-
    1. Per reg nurse education that teaches values in the lecture and in the care environment. Education that produces SKILLED nurses who have had one year post qualifying to hone these newly acquired skills.
    2. Employers that understand How nursing makes a difference and values that registered nurse MUST provide evidenced based up to date safe practice at all times.
    3. Real nursing leadership that promotes the value of nursing and communicates this to the public.

    I could go on....

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  • "In addition, hourly nursing rounds would be systematically implemented and the “NHS Safety Thermometer” tool would be introduced to track four key standards of safety and nursing quality – pressure ulcers, falls, blood clots and catheter-acquired urinary tract infections."

    how about nutrition and hydration and temperature control?

    Leadership should read 'clinical nursing leadership'

    nursing had excellent leadership but it was stifled by general management and the government!

    "Deputy chief nursing officer for England David Foster outlined the four areas at a nursing workforce conference held last week in London. The themes are: “People first”, “values and culture”, “time to care” and “leadership”."

    these are all good areas to focus on but shouldn't nurses themselves be outlining the themes of importance which concern them and the patients in their care?

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  • “time to care”

    Erm - but almost everyone on NT, insists that not having enough time to care, is the largest part of the problem the NHS is suffering from !

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  • Identify barriers to prevent a nurse doing their job properly. Two spring to mind straight away.
    1. Not enough staff for patient dependancy
    2. Paperwork

    I would also like to add there needs to be more concern for the welfare of its nurses. It would be nice if there was someone to visit the wards ensuring the staff are fed and hydrated. Oh well dream on.

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  • Albert's Mum

    Anonymous | 28-Feb-2012 11:28 pm

    There have just been some pronouncements that allowing Ward Sisters more control over how thier wards function, with less control over that from higher up the management chain, is a necessary change.

    Which makes sense if the Ward Sisters are good - otherwise managers are likely to claim that they will get blamed for mistakes they have no control over.

    This is like an ongoing giant tug-of-war, between educating staff and just letting them get on with it using their own brains, and the imposition of restrictive procedures which often follows someone's cock-up or malpractice/incompetence.

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  • I thought this was what ward sisters were for. At least it was until General Management was introduced to the NHS.

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