By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

60 SECONDS WITH…

60 seconds with ... Alan Glasper, Professor of children's and young people's nursing

We talk to Professor Alan Glasper, foundation professor of nursing and professor of children’s and young people’s nursing at the University of Southampton, who has worked in the profession for 43 years.

We talk to Professor Alan Glasper, foundation professor of nursing and professor of children’s and young people’s nursing at the University of Southampton, who has worked in the profession for 43 years.

Why did you decide to become a nurse?

At school I began to invest heavily in rock music but found O-levels were not offered in this subject. I was, however, very good at biology and human biology and spotted an advert for an orthopaedic nursing course. As a dedicated mod I rode my scooter to the interview - the course tutor decided to give me a chance.

Where did you train?

At the Sunderland Orthopaedic and Accident Hospital, Friarage Hospital in Northallerton and Great Ormond Street Hospital.

What was your first job in nursing?

As Great Ormond Street’s first change nurse running a respiratory unit specialising in the care of children with cystic fibrosis and asthma.

What is the trait you least like in yourself and why?

Even as a child I wanted everyone to sing to my own personal hymn sheet. It has taken me many years to realise that my enthusiasm for a project may not necessarily be embraced by my colleagues.

From whom have you learnt most in your career?

Kate Kershaw, former director of nurse education at The Charles West School of Nursing, Great Ormond Street. She taught me that the reward of teaching and imparting evidence-based knowledge to the next generation of nurses is the most important aspect of the role.

What advice would you give someone starting out?

In God we trust but everyone else must have evidence. Embrace evidence-based practice, read widely and remember to put the patient first and do them no harm.

What’s the most satisfying part of your job?

Teaching and writing. I enjoy helping aspiring scholars to showcase their own nursing prowess through publications.

Imparting evidence-based knowledge to the next generation of nurses is the most important aspect of the role

What is your proudest achievement?

Becoming the first practising children’s nurse to be awarded a professorial position. Through that I have been able to interact with all levels of my profession at home and abroad. I was also privileged to lead several RCN children’s nursing initiatives to Romania in the early years after the Romanian revolution.

What do you think makes a good nurse?

Aptitude, courage, humility, compassion and recognising that care delivery of the highest quality is the essence of nursing.

What job would you like to be doing in five years?

If my wife has her way, managing the garden.

What would you have done if you hadn’t become a nurse?

My woodwork teacher once smashed my dovetail joint to pieces with a mallet and said I would never make a carpenter. I suspect journalism might have called me, although the novel I started five years ago has not progressed past chapter three.

If you could change one thing in healthcare, what would it be?

Nursing’s reputation, which has been tarnished in recent years.

What would your ideal weekend involve?

An autumnal walk in the Yorkshire Dales ending with a pub lunch with a roaring log fire.

If you could spend an hour in someone’s company, who would it be and why?

I would travel back in time to meet Catherine Jane Wood one of The Hospital for Sick Children’s most famous matrons. It was Catherine, who first articulated in the Nursing Record, that: ‘Sick Children require special nursing and sick children’s nurses require special training’; thus leaving a legacy for future historians to use when defending the existence of direct entry children’s nursing.

What would your ideal weekend involve?

An autumnal walk in the Yorkshire Dales ending with a pub lunch with a roaring log fire.

 

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

    newsletterpromo