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Research decoded: what skin products should be avoided on older skin?

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24 December, 2012
  • Article: Maintaining skin health in older people
  • Authors:  Fiona Cowdell is senior research fellow and graduate research director at the Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull; Kathy Radley is lecturer in skin health and dermatology care at the Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull, and clinical nurse specialist, dermatology at United Lincolnshire Hospitals Trust.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • How to improve care of skin for older people
  • The importance of skin assessment in older people
  • The different types of treatment available

 

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

  • Skin health
  • Ageing
  • Older people

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

 This article will be useful to you on many of your placements where you will care for older people. Skin in older people is more delicate and more prone to damage. Skin barrier function and skin changes associated with ageing are discussed. Because of aging, skin assessment is essential and the use of washing products and emollients needs to be carefully judged. This article identifies methods by which elderly people and you can help to promote and improve skin health.

 

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • How do I broach the topic with an older person?

 

 

STUDENT NT DECODER

  • Cognitive impairment: this affects the ability to think, concentrate, formulate ideas, reason and remember. It is happens as a result of an accident or illness. 
  • Stratum corneum: is the outer layer of the epidermis and is made of dead, flat skin cells that shed about every 2 weeks.
  • Humectant:is a substance that absorbs or helps another substance retain moisture, such as glycerol.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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