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Save hospitals 'for seriously ill', says NHS Confederation

Caring for patients in the community and their own homes and saving hospitals for the seriously ill and those needing complicated operations could be the way forward for the NHS, a report has claimed.

The NHS Confederation believes the whole NHS system should be overhauled to make it more efficient and more effective. Its report says limiting inpatient care in large hospitals to those with life-threatening illnesses and patients needing acute care and treating others elsewhere could be an effective strategy.

It also suggests the new commissioners should work with service providers to help the NHS best serve people and develop more health services in the community and carried out in the patient’s home.

The new paper from the NHS Confederation’s community health services forum, entitled Transforming local care, says people need to change their attitudes about where healthcare should be delivered from hospitals to the community.

The organisation is now asking the government and NHS Commissioning Board to work together and make sure the funding for health and social care aids the move towards caring for patients in the community. It puts forward ideas including cash incentives for preventing health problems as well as early intervention and integrated working.

And the confederation argues that money saved by making things more efficient should be ploughed into setting up health services in the community.

Interim director of policy at the confederation, Jo Webber, said for a long time people have automatically associated health care with hospitals. But she said that while major hospitals were the best places to offer acute care, they were usually not ideal for those needing long-term care or treatment.

She said Britain already had excellent examples of care being delivered in the community, improving standards and the experience of the patient as well as helping make the NHS more efficient.

She added: “It is time we started thinking differently right across the country, and making sure investment supports innovative service delivery that supports patients’ independence and recovery.”

<http://www.hsj.co.uk/acutecare/index.html> (Acute care)

 

Readers' comments (7)

  • Ha, ha, ha, this will not happen when foundation trusts are now massive centres of self perpetuating interests voraciously digesting hospitals declared as "non-viable".
    Surgeon unconfigure thyself!

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  • ....or put another way if long term patients are going to be malnourished or dehydrated they can do it in the comfort of their own homes.

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  • Duuurr

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  • How much did it cost to produce this report? Sounds like a strategy from a decade or two ago, from a US model of healthcare.
    Less estates costs, less staffing costs, no need to worry about feeding + drinking issues about what to stock, cook, or wash. In fact cheap HCAs can be replaced by cheaper volunteers and family members to look after chronically ill patients.
    Is it their aim to make bigger profits from fitter, generally healthier + more likely to recovery patients, also to save lives of those most likely to contribute to the national economy?
    In community care, they'll probably look at saving delivery costs of meds + materials by asking family or friends to collect or charge for delivery. They might look at ways of preventing waste of over prescribing + stockpiling of meds, which could limit patient's + GPs budgets.

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  • tinkerbell

    save the hospitals for the rich who can afford 'complicated' operations, for the rest of us it's over.

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  • Being around a long time does not necessarily impart wisdom. It does, however leave memories. From my memory this hackneyed refrain is hawked around every decade or so and in essence is true, no more so with Mid Staffs et al at the present, that you are more likely to be treated better in your home than in Hospital.

    The reality of this is, that the great and the good, (MP's, over paid bureaucrats and all that drifts in their wake, PFI to name one) have proved totally unable to get near the issue. The principle reason is, care costs. I started nursing in 1963 and as a newly qualified Staff Nurse in 1966, I earned the princely sum of £13/week. Time's have changed the reader will say, and that bears no argument. But time dictate that if you want all types of care you will not achieve it merely from the soothing hand on the fevered brow, as important as this is it will not produce the calibre of nurse required for the high end of care, Critical Care, NICU etc..

    Nonetheless, the new masters of the Universe in Health Care demand competitive salaries to "attract the best people", the "best people" seemed to have pulled the 3 card trick, in Medway leaving many dead from C.Diff, moving on to offer their services as "Consultants" on solving the problem. Gagging those senior enough to do damage and bullying those junior enough to cut and run. At the same time these 'leaders' feel that highly experienced nurse, many of whom have added to their qualifications at their own expense, should be prepared to work for salaries consistent with semi-skilled factory workers.

    Care costs, you won't see your car serviced by apprentices in any dealership, but today's managers are happy to dilute the trained workforce to deliver high end health care. That's the society we now live in. It's useless to agonise over the fate of Nursing, Briggs started it in 1972 and the Griffiths Report in 1983 put the nails in the coffin when nurse were able to seat on the fence by opting out of nursing decisions, citing their new role as mangers and opting out of management decisions hiding behind their nursing credentials.

    We are where we are, as the saying goes, I retired in 2011 after nearly 49 years in nursing from the frontline to the top and finally on the frontline in ICU. It wasn't age nor illness that prompted my retirement, it was the wave after wave of managers who didn't get it. How ironic that this new generation of young tyros still don't get it and sadly, the patients are even less likely to!

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  • John Howes

    Being around a long time does not necessarily impart wisdom. It does, however leave memories. From my memory this hackneyed refrain is hawked around every decade or so and in essence is true, no more so with Mid Staffs et al at the present, that you are more likely to be treated better in your home than in Hospital.

    The reality of this is, that the great and the good, (MP's, over paid bureaucrats and all that drifts in their wake, PFI to name one) have proved totally unable to get near the issue. The principle reason is, care costs. I started nursing in 1963 and as a newly qualified Staff Nurse in 1966, I earned the princely sum of £13/week. Time's have changed the reader will say, and that bears no argument. But time dictate that if you want all types of care you will not achieve it merely from the soothing hand on the fevered brow, as important as this is it will not produce the calibre of nurse required for the high end of care, Critical Care, NICU etc..

    Nonetheless, the new masters of the Universe in Health Care demand competitive salaries to "attract the best people", the "best people" seemed to have pulled the 3 card trick, in Medway leaving many dead from C.Diff, moving on to offer their services as "Consultants" on solving the problem. Gagging those senior enough to do damage and bullying those junior enough to cut and run. At the same time these 'leaders' feel that highly experienced nurse, many of whom have added to their qualifications at their own expense, should be prepared to work for salaries consistent with semi-skilled factory workers.

    Care costs, you won't see your car serviced by apprentices in any dealership, but today's managers are happy to dilute the trained workforce to deliver high end health care. That's the society we now live in. It's useless to agonise over the fate of Nursing, Briggs started it in 1972 and the Griffiths Report in 1983 put the nails in the coffin when nurse were able to seat on the fence by opting out of nursing decisions, citing their new role as mangers and opting out of management decisions hiding behind their nursing credentials.

    We are where we are, as the saying goes, I retired in 2011 after nearly 49 years in nursing from the frontline to the top and finally on the frontline in ICU. It wasn't age nor illness that prompted my retirement, it was the wave after wave of managers who didn't get it. How ironic that this new generation of young tyros still don't get it and sadly, the patients are even less likely to!

    Unsuitable or offensive?

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