By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Trust launches matron awareness campaign

The Francis report has prompted matrons at Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals Trust to launch a campaign to raise awareness of their role.

According to the trust, its matrons were keen to reassure local people about nursing care, following the publication in February of the public inquiry report into care failings at Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust.

Trust director of nursing Pippa Hart said: “We, like hospitals across the NHS, are absolutely committed to learning from the failings at Mid Staffordshire. 

“That’s exactly why our matrons are reminding local people of their responsibilities and are raising awareness of the vital roles they play in our hospitals.

“We have a wonderful team of nursing staff at our hospitals, but we rely on our patients and their loved ones to tell us if we are doing well,” she added.

Pippa King, one of the matrons leading the campaign launch, said: “Our dedicated teams of nurses are also available to help, but we want local people to know that they can talk to us too – we’re not like Hattie Jacques anymore.”

As part of the campaign, Ms Hart and the trust’s chief executive Matthew Hopkins – who trained as a Macmillan cancer nurse at the start of his career – will be spending a shift with the matrons.

Mr Hopkins said: “It’s important to show support to all of our staff and especially our nurses and matrons who are the backbone of our hospitals. I hope I can meet their very high standards on shift.”

Are you able to Speak Out Safely? Sign our petition to put pressure on your trust to support an open and transparent NHS.

Readers' comments (3)

  • I fully agree, Matrons have a key role to play in maintaining standards and engendering the publics faith in the caring professions. However, they need to be seen by the public and they need to be seen to have teeth. While some will say that the "Hattie Jacques" image was too remote and unapproachable it exuded the sense of authority needed to ensure standards were met.

    Matrons need to meet patients and find out what they think of the care and attention they receive, not spend all their time managing beds and trying to find staff.

    If something is wrong, they need to act and be seen to act (by management, patients and staff alike) to ensure correct standards are maintained - if that means bringing nursing staff, Dr's etc to task then so be it. Unfortunately, political correctness now seems to be in the way of patient advocacy and safety. Matrons find themselves gagged by rules that have been interpreted to mean that the robust enforcement of clinical standards is now considered "bullying".

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Still can't believe that male nurses use the title matron.

    Surely the Hattie Jacques figure did represent what patients want from a Matron - someone who sets standards and is accountable. Isnt that why the public cried 'bring back Matron' in the first place.

    Sounds like this trust has the right idea though, nice to hear of some support and celebration of nurses.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • more like trying to save their jobs. we need more hands on nurses and less pager and clipboard carrying white elephants. as for the CEO and director of nursing why not spend shifts with the real nurses. I was never impressed with the introduction of these matrons, just adding another layer of corporate management, using public money for a glorified title.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

newsletterpromo