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Board game aims to improve knowledge on dysphagia

  • 16 Comments

A game-based training tool to support people caring for patients with swallowing difficulties has been launched this week.

NHS England has worked with clinical games developer Focus Active Learning to create the unique game-based training tool to help improve detection and management of dysphagia.

It is aimed primarily at frontline clinicians and support staff in hospitals, care homes and hospices. It features a board game for face-to-face engagement and an online version.

NHS England director of patient safety Dr Mike Durkin said: “Dysphagia is a condition that can affect people of all ages but is often poorly understood by healthcare workers.

“We hope that this new training aid will provide a practical tool to build knowledge about this condition and improve detection and management of dysphagia,” he said.

The launch of the game marks the start of Nutrition and Hydration Week, which begins today and is intended to improve awareness and understanding of the significance of good nutrition and hydration in health and social care environments.

 

  • 16 Comments

Readers' comments (16)

  • What an insult to nurses intelligence!

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  • perhaps we could just turn everything into a game - even management and their targets - bulls eye!

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  • If it stops one healthcare worker giving fish and chips to a person with dysphagia then it has been an effective resource to aid learner.

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  • Anonymous | 19-Mar-2014 3:27 pm

    If it stops one healthcare worker giving fish and chips to a person with dysphagia then it has been an effective resource to aid learner.

    An appropriate handover and bedside documentation would be preferable I think.

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  • Maybe trainee surgeons could have one of these

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Operation-Board-Game-Free-UK-Post-classic-family-fun-MB-Games-Hasbro-/301128501466

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  • Whatever next! how patronising. Who plugged money into this?

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  • Anonymous | 19-Mar-2014 3:27 pm

    why would a healthcare worker give a patient with dysphagia fish and chips?

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  • its ok for those wishing to spend their time playing silly board games - each to their taste!

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  • I'm not sure clinicians and qualified nurses who regularly use their skills to assess a patients ability to swallow, but perhaps support staff who work in care homes and the like might find it a useful source of information. There is nothing wrong with making learning fun - as long as they are successful in passing on the information and it is retained.
    I remember prior to my nurse training getting very little training and support in the privately run nursing home that I worked in and at the age of 16, pretty much having to feel my own way on a variety of things. A tool like his may have been useful.
    I guess what I am trying to say is don't knock it - if you know alot about dysphagia - then this tool isn't aimed at you.

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  • I cannot believe it. All these comments are disgraceful. I have been qualified for 18 years and 2 months ago moved to the stroke unit. I thought I knew a lot about dysphagia but I could not have been more wrong. It is a hugely complex subject which is why Speech and Language therapists spend so much time with patients who have this condition.

    Yes, as nurses we have a general knowledge, but we are supposed to be learning and adapting ourselves for patient benefit all the time. What I have read is unbelieveable, to be honest. You are either all fantastic nurses who know everything about everything, or you are just insulted because you are in fact probably ignorant of the complexities of the problem and think it is an easy subject to know about. As for the hand over comment, patients conditions can change rapidly, especially in stroke, so get over yourselves and embrace the resources that are offered.

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