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Nurse called to NMC hearing for 15 serious complaints


A nurse has been ordered to answer serious allegations about his care and treatment of elderly patients at a Nursing and Midwifery Council Conduct and Competence Committee hearing next month.

Nicanor Sindanum, who is no longer employed by NHS Grampian, has been ordered to attend the September 20 hearing in London to answer 15 complaints he received while working as a nurse at Woodend Hospital in Aberdeen, which specialises in elderly patient care.

It is alleged that he gave one patient a month’s supply of a cancer drug in a week, gave another patient a salt cellar instead of an inhaler and continued to feed a patient who was choking.

The alleged incidents are thought to have taken place between October 2006 and January 2008.

It is also claimed that Mr Sindanum’s fitness to practise has been impaired through his alleged misconduct as a result of the cumulative failings.



Readers' comments (19)

  • Why did it take 15 complaints before he was called to answer for his actions, surely 14 would have been enough !!!!!!!

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  • Why so long to call him to account? It is now almost FIVE YEARS since the first incident. Surely, after the second or even third incident, his conduct and capability should have been thoroughly investigated?

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  • Why are NT publishing details about unproven allegations? By all means report on the evidence as it is presented, and indeed should the allegations be found to be proven, but this smacks of guilty until proven innocent.

    Is it a slow news day?

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  • Anonymous | 18-Aug-2011 1:26 pm I totally agree, what if this man is completely innocent (i'm not saying he is or not) but his name and details are splashed all over these pages? Anonymity should be given until proven absolutely guilty, and that goes for the NMC too!!!!

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  • This must be against some sort of human rights to publish your name and the allegations without anything being proven?? Anyone in the public can make something up and call the NMC direct- and your details will be there for everyone to read-you can look on the NMC website and they publish the names and area of people going to panel and the allegations against them for the world to read!
    Also the time it takes to go to the NMC panel is disgusting. It usually takes 3 years for the case to be investigated and heard- good to know our fees are being utilised effectively!

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  • Not really NHS Nurse, the NMC do it with impunity, the slightest hint of a witch hunt - sorry, I mean investigation - and they ruin peoples reputations, although I absolutely agree that it should be against some sort of right or law to do so.

    It is wrong. So wrong.

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  • I agree, there should be anonymity until absolute guilt is proven. Why though, did it take 15 complaints before the alarm was raised and why has it taken 5 years to bring this man to account? - it beggers belief!!

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  • I feel that this persons name should not have been mentioned AT ALL. What happened to inncocent until proven guilty??? I have gone through a horrific experience with my former Trust after I reported neglect and abuse. I previously had a totally unblemished 20 year career, with not a single mark on my name. After I reported neglect, I got handed six years worth of allegations that I knew nothing about. I have to say the NMC were totally supportive and did not take my case forward to investigation due to the spurious nature of the alleged complaints, not to mention the arms and legs that sprouted throughout the two and a half years I went through internal investigation at the TRUST, as well as the altered documents etc: The NMC did not print my name, so am shocked that this has happened to this person. I continue to fight my battle against my former Trust (six years now), they refuse to go to high court unfortunately, even though they disagree with the NMC's decision and just continue to spread rumours about me by phone to my employers. I will continue to fight until I get justice for myself and the patient in question. One thing I have learned is that people do judge you, even those you thought you were close to. People forget that there are individuals who can, and do, get together to make one persons life a misery, especially if they are good at what they do. God forbid you advocate for patients in the NHS. You will be got rid of ( in my experience). There is still racist and homophobic people that work in the NHS and people should know by now that it only takes a group of those people to get together and make someones life a misery. It is surprisingly easy for them, but all is not what it seems. Luckily my bullies made total idiots of themselves in their statements. If this person had soooo many complaints then the Trust should have acted sooner, end of. So why didn't they, either it's not true or they are just as dysfunctional and should be brought to account as well, including the nurses that stood by and allowed it to happen/or not. My case was heard by the NMC just 7 months after my dismissal because I got in contact with my Parliament representative, so feel lucky I didn't have to wait three years. I really wish people wouldn't judge so spontaneously. Especially when they clearly are not aware of the whole story. Unless you've been through it, then no one should have an opinion and certainly this person should not have been named.

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  • Answer for Debra Smallbone, the reason it would take so long for a Trust to bring someone to account after 15 complaints is twofold really. The alleged *guilty* party, not actually being guilty in the first place for one. If someone had brought a genuine concern forward at the beginning about this Nurse, then he would have been in a better position to defend himself. Then it would be on record and each subsequent complaint about him would also be in writing. Then each time this person was able to defend himself appropriately, the pattern of bullying (if it is that) would be obvious and in writing. Trusts can't have that really, because they know it means litigation, so they throw allsorts at people they don't like in order to upset and confuse them to the point where they walk away and don't do anything about it. And Debra, *this man* you refer to is a person who very well may be innocent of all charges. It took my Trust 2.5 years to sack me after I reported neglect and abuse towards a patient and my case was heard by the NMC the following year. The NMC found no case to answer. Today, I am still fighting for my justice as well as justice for the patient concerned because the Trust concerned still harrass me as opposed to going to High Court to try and overturn the NMC's decision. Yip, five years may seem a long time to some who haven't gone through it, but my five years has flown by. I could have walked away, sometimes I nearly walked away, but I'm still fighting, not only for myself, but for the other innocent nurses who have had to walk away due to ill health and the dreadful stress this sort of thing puts you through, not to mention the patient I was advocating for and who's pained face I still see on a daily basis, even after five years and a result of no case to answer from the NMC.

    The second reason, of course for the delay on behalf of this Trust, is that they are clearly dysfunctional in some way.

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  • Is there no privacy law to prevent this?
    Mind you, if a person has to appear in a court of law to answer an accusation nobody cares about their anonymity do they? Even if they are supposedly innocent until proven guilty. Yes, a bit more complex than at first sight

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