By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Specialist nurses urged to join new elderly care 'fellowship' programme

Band 7 and 8 nurses are being invited to apply for an expert training programme, as part of national efforts to improve care for the growing number of older patients seeking treatment from the NHS.

Health Education England is inviting nurses working in older people’s services to apply to join its inaugural Older Person’s Nurse Fellowship programme.

The national education body said it wanted the programme to create a “cadre of nurse leaders who are recognised experts in the care of older people”.

“HEE recognises the importance of developing and training nurses caring for older people with complex needs so that they have the expertise and skills required to excel in their role”

Lisa Bayliss-Pratt

The fellowship will be a specialist education programme, targeted at nurses able to demonstrate experience of working in older person’s healthcare at a senior level – such as clinical nurse specialists or community matrons.

The one year, part-time fellowship will consist of a mix of distance and online learning, plus study days, trips and events at King’s College London.

There will be two cohorts of 12 students. One will commence studying in November 2014 and finish in October 2015, and the second will begin in March 2015 and finish in February 2016.

The 24 students who make up the first two cohorts will have their programme fees funded by Health Education England and up to a maximum of 15 days salary backfill paid to their employer.

Professor Lisa Bayliss-Pratt, director of nursing at Health Education England, said the training and education body recognised the “importance of developing and training nurses caring for older people with complex needs”.

Lisa Bayliss-PrattLisa Bayliss-Pratt

She added: “The Older Person’s Nurse Fellow Programme aims to develop a cadre of nurse leaders who are recognised experts in the care of older people and who have national influence and are able to drive change so that the care of older people is compassionate and of the highest possible quality.”

The creation of the fellowship programme was announced in May by Health Education England in its annual mandate from the government, along with a number of other measures to boost nurse training in older patient and dementia care, as reported by Nursing Times.

It said it would review the content of pre-registration degrees to ensure all new nurses had the right skills to work with older people and that it would develop a bespoke older persons’ nurse postgraduate qualification training programme.

The measures are in part a response to recommendations made by the Francis report into care failings at Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust.

The Francis report warned that the growing number of older patients should be recognised urgently and called for the creation of new role to take the lead role in nursing this group in hospitals.

Specially trained “older person’s nurses” should lead improvements in care on wards with significant numbers of elderly patients, the seminal report said in February 2013.

Although rejecting the new role, the government said in its response to the report that it would “go further” by aiming to strengthen the focus on the complex needs of older people through training of the nursing workforce.

  • Applications to join the Older Person’s Nurse Fellow Programme must be received by 5pm, 19 September. More information is available from the King’s College London website.

 

Readers' comments (5)

  • michael stone

    Right:

    'She added: “The Older Person’s Nurse Fellow Programme aims to develop a cadre of nurse leaders who are recognised experts in the care of older people and who have national influence and are able to drive change so that the care of older people is compassionate and of the highest possible quality.”'

    Don't get me wrong, I have no issue at all, with 'nursing of the elderly' as a 'specialism'.

    But I have my doubts about how much wider influence, 24 expert nurses will be able to exert. It would, I think, require more than that (at least one expert nurse per CCG springs to mind ?).

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Here we go again. Just for the NHS! there are many nurses in the private sector that would love to have this opportunity of further study. There are many very experienced nurses already working with the elderly in care homes, the main domain of elder care. In the past nurses have not seen elder care that attractive and have stayed in the NHS away from the main thrust of elder care. Is it now to be turned into yet again another specialism that only the 'great and the good' can access with a piece of paper to go with it. HEE would do better to make education for all nurses or would be nurses more easily accessible throughout UK. Try living in the west country on Exmoor or the Quantocks, where? I hear you say Again those with their heads in the clouds away from reality are missing the real needs of the patient and those who care for them. Elderly people are not commodoties on which some wish to enhance their personal careers and pay scale.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Michael Stone - still attempting to meddle in nursing affairs. Hopefully this site will one day resort to worthwhile commenting from nursing as well as some intelligent inter- and intraprofessional academic debate. One can only hope - and bye till then with MS monopolizing the site with his buffoonery there is no room for good nursing debate on the site.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 11-Aug-2014 9:20 pm

    Perfect sense - something that gets lost in NHS 'bureaucracy' all too often. And I strongly agree with your point about the NHS and other healthcare being inappropriately 'separated' (especially as a lot of NHS care, is now provided by commercial organisations).

    Anonymous | 12-Aug-2014 12:15 pm

    Well up to your usual standard. Other comment would be superfluous.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • I am not sure this is jut limited to those working in the NHS. I work in the chaity sector and plan to apply if I can. It sounds to me like te start of something that could help innovate, encourage better quality care, and really consider the needs of our ageing society. I was really pleased to see this.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

newsletterpromo