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Do degree-trained students lack compassion?

  • Comments (19)

Crick P et al (2014) Why do student nurses want to be nurses? Nursing Times; 110: 5, 12-15.

Abstract:

Background
Nursing became an all graduate entry profession in September 2013; this move and the publication of the Francis report have brought the debate around nurse education and nurses’ capacity to care into sharper focus. There is much debate over what makes a good nurse and whether graduate nurses lack care and compassion.

Aim and method
This study investigated a cohort of pre-registration student nurses on the first day of their course about their motivations to join the profession, what being a nurse meant to them and which aspects of nursing they valued most.

Results
The demographics of the degree student group were similar to those of diploma students. Reasons cited for entering the profession and views on the nurse’s role showed that students’ motivations and perceptions focused on nursing as a caring rather than a technical profession.

Discussion
The characteristics of the degree students, their strong motivation to care and perception of nursing in altruistic terms contradict the media image of student nurses as being primarily academically, technically and career driven.

 

What do you think?

 

  • Do degree-trained students lack compassion?
  • How does a move to all-degree training affect the profession as a whole?
  • Is there pressure for nurses with a diploma to “top-up” to a degree?
  • Comments (19)

Readers' comments (19)

  • Tinkerbell

    Do degree-trained students lack compassion?

    No, no and thrice no.

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  • Anonymous

    Nursing has been an all graduate profession in Wales since 2004, a fact that the rest of the country seems to overlook! There is 10 years of experience there to draw upon to inform evidence based conclusions. That said, surely holding a degree and being compassionate are not mutually exclusive.

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  • No, of course degree-trained student nurses do not lack compassion.

    As the study above highlights, reasons for entering the profession have not changed since 2008, and either way, the entry interviews for university courses focus more on who you are as a person than qualifications you may have achieved.

    As a student nurse I find the media image of student nurses frustrating. Everyone on my course is compassionate and cares greatly about the clients under their care on placements. Degree or not, people attracted to the profession are the same as before, which is indicated by this study.

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  • Anonymous

    This is interesting. I have worked for 16 years in the health service and been a staff nurse for 9 years. As far as I can see it is the older generation of nurses who feel threatened by the degree nurses coming in. I have met some shocking degree students who are only here for the money, but I have also met some brilliant degree nurses who would put the older generation to shame. If you see poor practice challenge it, don't stand for it. In nursing it is the patients who matter, so older nurses put your skills and experience into practice and train your students to be brilliant nurses and don't let the word degree put you off, a piece of paper does not undo 30 years of experience, so don't be prejudicial to students, encourage them to shine, challenge and guide the poor ones out of nursing because after all the students of today will be looking after you when you get older and need them, so make them the best students in the world.

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  • Do degree trained medical students lack compassion? Do degree trained physiotherapy students lack compassion? Will degree trained paramedic students lack compassion? Do all those nurses and midwives who undertook additional post registration study at degree level suddenly 'lose' comapssion... and just when did nurse training in Manchester start at degree level (the first school in England to offer a degree - no bias, I didn't do it) maybe in the 1980s- did we note the reduction in compassion?

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  • Anonymous

    Do degree trained medical students lack compassion? Do degree trained physiotherapy students lack compassion? Will degree trained paramedic students lack compassion? Do all those nurses and midwives who undertook additional post registration study at degree level suddenly 'lose' comapssion... and just when did nurse training in Manchester start at degree level (the first school in England to offer a degree - no bias, I didn't do it) maybe in the 1980s- did we note the reduction in compassion?

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  • Anonymous

    Tell what we do lack, compassion and understanding from a lot of the pre-degree nurses who are convinced that experience trumps education. That includes those now in management running services

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  • Anonymous

    I'm compassionate solely because im a male nurse
    the designer dressed female student is not compassionate

    neither of the above is true

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  • bill whitehead

    This article is based on carefully constructed and unbiased research conducted at the University of Derby by nurse researchers. It provides a straightforward empirically supported argument to say that nurses want to be nurses for the same reasons that nurses have always wanted to be nurses. The level of academic award appears to be irrelevant to their desire to become a professional nurse. Degree level education for nurses is important for lots of reasons (see my NT article from 2010 for some of them). However, the evidence suggests that nurses want to join the register because they want to nurse not because they desire a degree. Surely these are just the sort of degree level educated RNs that we need?

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  • Liz Charalambous

    No.

    I believe that compassion is an elusive concept, it ebbs and flows between and within individuals depending on circumstances, interactions and previous experiences.

    Having a degree is just one facet of the myriad of characteristics a nurse possesses, what we need to do is ensure nurses themselves are nurtured in their workplace environment and give them the support to be compassionate.

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