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Latest respiratory research

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  • Why we can't give up on smokingSubscription

    Amanda Clark, RN, MA.Deputy Editor, Professional Nurse'Sick of smoking? Why not give up?' This invitation is the theme of this year's National No Smoking Day on Wednesday 12 March.

  • 'Why do we remain so blasé about administering oxygen?'

    'Why do we remain so blasé about administering oxygen?'Subscription

    Oxygen is one of the most commonly administered drugs in acute care, often at high doses. However, given inappropriately, it can have adverse effects and, in susceptible patients, its injudicious use causes harm - even death.

    Comments (5)
  • Nurses are failing to detect patients whose physiological condition deteriorates in hospital

    Why can't we see what is right in front of us?Subscription

    Failure to spot deteriorating patients is a growing problem. The first step to fixing this is admitting your skills may not be up to date - it is your duty to stay informed, says Dan Higgins

    Comments (5)
  • cough.jpg

    Whooping coughSubscription

    VOL: 100, ISSUE: 43, PAGE NO: 31- Whooping cough or pertussis is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis….

  • Man with nasal cannular

    When should a nasal cannula be used to deliver oxygen?Subscription

    Nasal cannulas are used to deliver oxygen when a low flow, low or medium concentration is required, and the patient is in a stable state.

  • What is the correct way to remove a chest drain?

    What is the correct way to remove a chest drain?Subscription

    Nursing practice often involves undertaking procedures about which there is debate or uncertainty. In Practice Questions we ask experts to determine how nurses should approach these procedures

    Comments (2)
  • Continuing professional development is vital to develop and retain newly qualified staff

    What are the factors that affect band 5 nurses’ career development and progression?Subscription

    Continuing professional development is vital for all nurses to move between jobs. This study looked at the factors that helped or hindered band 5 nurses’ progress

    Comments (4)
  • Week 2 Diagnosis and assessmentSubscription

    VOL: 98, ISSUE: 36, PAGE NO: 27JUDITH McALLISTER, MA,RN, Respiratory Specialist Nurse, North Peterborough Primary Care Trust; Regional Trainer, Asthma and COPD, National Respiratory Training Centre, WarwickSponsored by PFIZERJUDITH McALLISTER, MA,RN, Respiratory Specialist Nurse, North Peterborough Primary Care Trust; Regional Trainer, Asthma and COPD, National Respiratory Training Centre, Warwick

  • We need more research to manage dyspnoeaSubscription

    My invitation to write this editorial came as I was attending the American Thoracic Society’s (ATS) International Conference in Toronto, Canada (16–21 May).

  • We must not miss having our say on how local services are runSubscription

    As the COPD strategy sets out what patients can expect, respiratory nurse specialists must ensure that they influence how services are set up and run

    Comments (1)

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