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Clinical articles

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  • A PEG service with nurses at its heartSubscription

    28 September, 2000Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 39, PAGE NO: 39 Cris Pollard, BA, RGN, is upper gastrointestinal nurse specialist, Department of Surgery, Leicester General Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

  • Where to now?Subscription

    7 December, 2000Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 49, PAGE NO: 1

  • Nil by mouthSubscription

    7 December, 2000Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 49, PAGE NO: 10

  • A multidisciplinary PEG service and the nurse specialistSubscription

    7 December, 2000Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 49, PAGE NO: 6 Stephanie White, RN, OND, Cert Ed Health, is clinical liaison nurse, gastroenterology unit, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne

  • Making sense of probioticsSubscription

    15 February, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 07, PAGE NO: 40Diane Palmer, BSc, RN, PGCE, is lecturer in nursing, University of HullPamela Barker, RN, is nutrition nurse specialist, Scarborough and North East Yorkshire Healthcare NHS TrustThe term probiotic was first described by Fuller (1991) as 'a live microbial feed supplement which beneficially affects the host animal by improving its microbial balance.'

  • Surgical therapy for inflammatory bowel diseaseSubscription

    8 March, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 10, PAGE NO: 34Judy Sercombe, RN, is inflammatory bowel disease specialist nurse, centre of gastroenterology, Royal Free Hospital, LondonCrohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic, relapsing inflammatory bowel disorders that affect the gastrointestinal tract. Their symptoms are similar and may include the passing of uncontrollable bloody diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever, anaemia, and loss of appetite and weight.

  • Colorectal cancerSubscription

    15 March, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the term for a cancer of any part of the large bowel, from the caecum, which lies next to the ileocaecal valve, to the anus. Cancers of the anus are relatively rare, however, and account for only 4% of all new cases of colorectal cancer reported each year in the UK (Jones and James, 1993).

  • Stoma care - 1(a) Cutting a templateSubscription

    22 March, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 12, PAGE NO: 43CHRIS METCALF, GASTROENTEROLOGY ENDOSCOPY NURSE SPECIALIST, WEST HERTS NHS TRUST, WATFORD GENERAL HOSPITAL.A variety of conditions may necessitate the formation of a colostomy or an ileostomy: carcinoma, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, diverticular disease, colonic obstruction, bowel ischaemia, anorectal incontinence, trauma and radiation damage.

  • Better quality of care for UGI cancer patientsSubscription

    22 March, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 12, PAGE NO: 36

  • Practical aspects of stoma careSubscription

    22 March, 2001Updated: 5 March, 2009

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 12, PAGE NO: 40Elaine Armstrong, RGN, is clinical nurse specialist in stoma care at the Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, LondonThe word stoma comes from the Greek word meaning 'mouth or opening', and a stoma can be created from any segment of bowel, both large (colon) and small (ileum). Stomas are created for a range of reasons, including cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, trauma and as an elective or emergency procedure.

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