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Issue : 5 February 2008

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  • Nurse Prescribing: National data analysisSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Authors Kathy Davis, PhD, BSc, SRN, is postdoctoral research fellow, Consortium for Healthcare Research, City University, London; Vari Drennan, PhD, MSc, BSc, RN, RHV, is professor of health policy, Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s Hospital Medical School, London.

  • Nurse Prescribing:  National data analysis

    Nurse Prescribing: National data analysisSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Authors Kathy Davis, PhD, BSc, SRN, is postdoctoral research fellow, Consortium for Healthcare Research, City University, London; Vari Drennan, PhD, MSc, BSc, RN, RHV, is professor of health policy, Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s Hospital Medical School, London.

  • We need a definition of nursing as HCAs take on more tasksSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Over the years many of us have engaged in debates about what nursing is; the philosophy that informs what we do and the way this influences how nursing is practised. Our philosophy of care guides decisions about how care should be organised, when it is appropriate to delegate care and whether nurses should take on new roles and responsibilities.While considerable amounts of time and paper have been dedicated to the pursuit of a definitive definition, it has been difficult to pin down.

  • We need a definition of nursing as HCAs take on more tasksSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Over the years many of us have engaged in debates about what nursing is; the philosophy that informs what we do and the way this influences how nursing is practised.

  • Reducing Admissions for Urinary CatheterisationSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Author Sandra Foulkes, MSc, BSc, Dip Community Studies, CertEd, RN, is clinical nurse specialist, Pontypridd and Rhondda NHS Trust.ABSTRACT Foulkes, S. (2008) Reducing admissions for urinary catheterisation. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 49–51.Sandra Foulkes describes a service development that reduced emergency admissions for urinary catheter-related problems through collaborative working and community catheter clinics. This will be supported by the use of a case study.

  • Reducing Admissions for Urinary CatheterisationSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Author Sandra Foulkes, MSc, BSc, Dip Community Studies, CertEd, RN, is clinical nurse specialist, Pontypridd and Rhondda NHS Trust.ABSTRACT Foulkes, S. (2008) Reducing admissions for urinary catheterisation. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 49–51.Sandra Foulkes describes a service development that reduced emergency admissions for urinary catheter-related problems through collaborative working and community catheter clinics. This will be supported by the use of a case study.

  • Vaginal cones in stress incontinence treatmentSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Author Jeanette Haslam, MPhil, Grad Dip Phys, MCSP, is a retired specialist physiotherapist in women’s health. abstract Haslam, J. (2008) Vaginal cones in stress incontinence treatment. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 44–45. Jeanette Haslam explains the theory that underpins the use of vaginal cones in stress urinary incontinence and how this translates into practice.

  • Vaginal cones in stress incontinence treatmentSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    author Jeanette Haslam, MPhil, Grad Dip Phys, MCSP, is a retired specialist physiotherapist in women’s health.abstract Haslam, J. (2008) Vaginal cones in stress incontinence treatment. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 44–45.Jeanette Haslam explains the theory that underpins the use of vaginal cones in stress urinary incontinence and how this translates into practice.

  • Urine collection in infants and childrenSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Authors: June Rogers, MSc, BA, RSCN, RN, is paediatric continence adviser, Liverpool PCT, Liverpool; Caroline Saunders, BSc, PGD, RSCN, RN, is consultant nurse urology/gynaecology, Royal Liverpool Children’s Hospital, Alder Hey, Liverpool.Abstract: Rogers, J., Saunders, C. (2008) Urine collection in infants and children. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 40–42.June Rogers and Caroline Saunders review current evidence and best practice regarding obtaining a urine specimen from children.

  • Urine collection in infants and childrenSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2008

    Authors: June Rogers, MSc, BA, RSCN, RN, is paediatric continence adviser, Liverpool PCT, Liverpool; Caroline Saunders, BSc, PGD, RSCN, RN, is consultant nurse urology/gynaecology, Royal Liverpool Children’s Hospital, Alder Hey, Liverpool.Abstract: Rogers, J., Saunders, C. (2008) Urine collection in infants and children. Nursing Times; 104: 5, 40–42.June Rogers and Caroline Saunders review current evidence and best practice regarding obtaining a urine specimen from children.

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