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A new era of collaboration

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VOL: 97, ISSUE: 03, PAGE NO: 1

Karen Green, RGN, NDN, DPSN, CPT, is a practice nurse trainer in north London and chair of the Wound Care Society

Maureen Benbow, RGN, BA Nurse Education, MSc, HERC, is a tissue viability nurse, Leighton Hospital, Mid-Cheshire Hospitals Trust, and former chair of the Tissue Viability Association

The annual wound management conference has become an important event in the wound care calendar over the past 10 years. In 2000 the meeting was jointly organised by the Tissue Viability Society, the Wound Care Society and the Journal of Wound Care for the first time. In an era when it seems that there is increasing competition between wound care organisations, this collaborative venture marks the growing maturity of the major UK wound care societies, with the partners working together to make Wounds 2000 a success for all delegates.

The annual wound management conference has become an important event in the wound care calendar over the past 10 years. In 2000 the meeting was jointly organised by the Tissue Viability Society, the Wound Care Society and the Journal of Wound Care for the first time. In an era when it seems that there is increasing competition between wound care organisations, this collaborative venture marks the growing maturity of the major UK wound care societies, with the partners working together to make Wounds 2000 a success for all delegates.

The conference programme was formulated to provide a relevant learning experience for hands-on nursing staff, establishing and reinforcing the links between research and the application of findings to manage practical wound care problems.

The event combined plenary sessions and workshops. The latter, which addressed topics such as bandaging, choosing support surfaces and dressing awkward wounds, were well attended. Further sessions that encouraged the development of new skills, such as writing for publication and the use of computer-generated slides, also attracted a large number of delegates, highlighting the fact that modern wound conferences can play a useful role in empowering delegates to share their knowledge and experience with others.

Several podium lectures generated considerable discussion. A presentation covering the current status and future development of nurse prescribing was expected to raise debate. Delegates noted that for many tissue viability and wound care nurse specialists prescribing was passing them by as they did not work in the community or possess a community qualification. It was generally considered that this anomaly between hospital and community sectors requires urgent attention to standardise practice.

In a thought-provoking plenary session on wound infection Martin Kiernan reminded the audience that, although antibiotic resistance is often the major preoccupation when considering the spread of infection, the most significant problems in wound care are generated by group A streptococci, organisms that are, for the time being, sensitive to penicillin.

Wounds 2000 was a milestone in the evolution of wound care in the UK. For the first time separate organisations pooled their expertise in a major conference. The Wound Care Society and the Tissue Viability Society remain committed to supporting collaborative ventures in wound care, and both look forward to future opportunities to work with each other and also with new partners. It is only through such collaboration that we will continue to develop high quality initiatives in wound care.

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