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Administration of medicines

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VOL: 98, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 41

PHIL JEVON, RESUSCITATION OFFICER, MANOR HOSPITAL, WALSALL

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There is only limited scientific evidence for the use of medicines during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (Resuscitation Council (UK), 2000). They should be considered only after the patient has been defibrillated (if indicated) and CPR has been undertaken.

There is only limited scientific evidence for the use of medicines during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (Resuscitation Council (UK), 2000). They should be considered only after the patient has been defibrillated (if indicated) and CPR has been undertaken.

Epinephrine (adrenaline) is the most common medicine used in CPR because it helps improve coronary and cerebral blood flow (Jevon, 2002).

The dose is 1mg (10ml of 1:10,000 solution) and it is usually administered every three minutes.

The preferred route for medicines administration is intravenously; central venous access is ideal if it is available.

When intravenous access is not available, the tracheal route can be used for the administration of some medicines, for example, epinephrine. However, the absorption of medicines via this route is not always reliable and it should therefore be considered a second-line approach. Consult local policy.

Most hospitals now use pre-filled syringes rather than ampoules for the delivery of medicines during CPR. The use of two types of pre-filled syringes is described in this Part.

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