Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Issue : April 2001

View all stories from this issue.

Sort By: Newest firstOldest firstA-ZZ-A

  • Positive inotrope therapySubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 36 Mandy Sheppard, RGN, is an independent training and development consultant The key function of the heart is to pump oxygenated blood from the lungs to all the body cells via the left side of the heart and arterial circulation. 

  • Stoma care - 4 - Fitting a 2-piece applianceSubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 43

  • When parents have learning difficultiesSubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 40Nicky Richardson, RMN, RNLDNicky Richardson, RMN, RNLD

  • Pain tool audit in coronary careSubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 38Fiona Bett, BA, RGN, is staff nurse, cardiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh NHS TrustPain is a complex and subjective experience that is difficult to assess. Many factors influence how it is communicated, including age, culture, gender and personality. The meaning patients attach to pain can also have a profound effect on how they may react to and express their pain (East, 1992).

  • Deep vein thrombosis - aetiology and preventionSubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 34

  • Who cares if we don't value nurses?Subscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 33Pat Ramdhanie RGN HV DNDThe debate over nursing versus social care never ends, especially in the field of long-term care. A cynic might say that the difficulties are financial because nurses are a scarce resource, if not a luxury item. If it is becoming harder to find new nurses, then a way must be found to require fewer of them. And what better way to do so than to look at nursing care as simply a list of tasks that have to be performed?

  • Part 4.3: The contribution of nursesSubscription

    Clinical26 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 17, PAGE NO: 45Petra KoppMary Ward, Assistant clinical editor and Good Practice Network Coordinator, Nursing Times;Mark Radcliffe, Features editor, Nursing TimesThe government has stressed the important role nurses have to play in improving the quality of health care through their contribution to the achievement of the six quality parameters set out in The NHS Performance Assessment Framework (NHS Executive, 1999).

  • Larva therapySubscription

    Clinical19 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 16, PAGE NO: 38

  • Increasing fibre: why and howSubscription

    Clinical19 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 16, PAGE NO: 54

  • Developing an enteral feeding skills stationSubscription

    Clinical19 April, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 16, PAGE NO: 52Rebecca George, BSc, RGN, is nutrition support nurse, Torbay Hospital, DevonBoth administration of medication and aseptic technique are taught and assessed as defined skills (Shaw, 1994). However, enteral tube-feeding skills are predominantly acquired according to the 'see one, do one, teach one' ethos and so do not always share the same clinical importance.

Show  10 per page20 per page50 per page