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Are drug rounds necessary?

  • Comments (10)

Why do we do drug rounds? Are they really the safest system for administering medications, or should drugs be given at the same time as other elements of care?

What do you think?

  • Comments (10)

Readers' comments (10)

  • Anonymous

    seems like it's better to do drugs separately - your mind needs to be focussed because any mistake could be deadly

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  • Anonymous

    definetly seperately that way you are focused on the drugs and people are less likely to be missed

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  • Anonymous

    Drug round remains one of the last rituals that hasn't been assimulated into individualised care. It means patients often get delayed analgesia and drugs at the wrong time

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  • I agree with the above comments, but with individualised 'drug rounds' for lack of a better term, there comes with it a vastly increased demand on our time, unless there is a significant increase in staffing levels, making it pretty impractical.

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  • Anonymous

    I agree with Mike on this one.

    If a patient needs to have particular drugs on a specific timescale, we could do those at different times, or they could self medicate if appropriate, but if we are trying to do everyones drugs at different times outside of an established drug round, things are going to get missed, especially when you have lots of patients to care for. There just isn't the staff to do it that way.

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  • Anonymous

    There was a big drive on self medication many years ago, and for the patients that were able to manage it ... it worked. Yet another practice that has diminished into us having 'lost it'. There are certain drugs that we have to be consiencious with, for example medication for Parkinson's Disease. Medicating patients with this condition has not been good in the past. Most presciption sheets I have seen have preprinted times on them, which doesn't give any flexibility. We criticise rituals unless they suit us.

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  • Anonymous

    Significant staffing implications in mental health settings...the principle is sound , but the reality of acute mental health settings causes difficulties as staffing levels have been cut to the bone, often with one trained nurse trying to juggle resources....

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  • Anonymous

    Well why stop at individualised medications and the time that this will take up..... why not let,s have separate mealtimes in care settings after all not everyone eats at the same time!!!!

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  • When I worked in a private patient unit we didn't have drug rounds - each nurse was responsible for giving the drugs to their own group of patients rather than one nurse doing a 'whole ward round'. It worked very well.

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  • Anonymous

    idealistic in theory but would need huge organisational changes, staffing levels and funding otherwise there is the risk of more medication being missed and more errors in administration and also at the expense of other essential care.

    how about examining and eliminating some of the other more minor purposeless rituals first and then one day when we have our super new, well funded, well resourced and well staffed state of the art health service we can start concentrating on totally holistic, patient centered care which we would all like to give or receive!

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