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Category list : Assessment

Stories with this category.

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  • Therapeutic careSubscription

    Clinical7 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 36, PAGE NO: 39 Mave Salter, MSc, RN, is clinical nurse specialist, community liaison, at the Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey

  • A pressure damage prevention strategySubscription

    Clinical7 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 36, PAGE NO: 12Claire Martin, BSc, RGN, DipPNS, is wound care clinical nurse specialist, Brighton Health Care NHS TrustUntil September 1997, pressure prevention and relief at Brighton Health Care NHS Trust was a mix of pockets of excellence and areas with no defined plan.

  • Mattresses and beds: reducing and relieving pressureSubscription

    Clinical7 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 36, PAGE NO: 9

  • Identifying and treating PCPSubscription

    Clinical14 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 19 Veronica Bastow, MSc, SRP, is superintendent physiotherapist, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King’s Lynn, Norfolk

  • Fournier's gangreneSubscription

    Clinical21 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 38, PAGE NO: 12 Martin Kiernan, MPH, RGN, ONC, DipN, is senior clinical nurse specialist, control of infection, Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust

  • Measuring peak expiratory flowSubscription

    Clinical21 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 38, PAGE NO: 49PHIL JEVON, RESUSCITATION TRAINING OFFICER; BEVERLEY EWENS, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, MANOR HOSPITAL, WALSALLJOAN MANZIE, RESPIRATORY NURSE SPECIALIST, AT MANOR HOSPITAL, WALSALLPeak expiratory flow (PEF) or peak flow is defined as 'the maximum flow achievable from a forced expiration starting at full inspiration with an open glottis' (BTS & ARTP, 1994). It is a simple, cost-effective test in the assessment of respiratory disease.

  • A PEG service with nurses at its heartSubscription

    Clinical28 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 39, PAGE NO: 39 Cris Pollard, BA, RGN, is upper gastrointestinal nurse specialist, Department of Surgery, Leicester General Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

  • Bladder ultrasoundSubscription

    Clinical28 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 39, PAGE NO: 49RAY ADDISON, NURSE CONSULTANT IN BLADDER AND BOWEL DYSFUNCTION, MAYDAY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST, CROYDONBladder ultrasound avoids the need for catheterisation to estimate residual urine volume. Risk assessment shows that catheterisation for estimation of residual urine should be avoided.

  • The benefits of a nurse-led preoperative assessment clinicSubscription

    Clinical28 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 39, PAGE NO: 42 Paul Ryan, BA, RGN, is clinical nurse specialist (orthopaedics) at Rotherham General Hospital

  • A guide to bladder ultrasoundSubscription

    Clinical5 October, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 40, PAGE NO: 14 Ray Addison, BSc, RN, FETC, CertHEd, is nurse consultant, bladder and bowel dysfunction, Mayday Healthcare NHS Trust, Croydon. Residual urine occurs when either a physical or neurological impediment obstructs the flow of urine or prevents the detrusor muscle from contracting effectively. 

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