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Category list : Asthma

Stories with this category.

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  • Patient empowerment: the key to compliance in asthmaSubscription

    Clinical14 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 8

  • KNOW HOW Asthma inhalersSubscription

    Clinical14 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 14Linda Pearce MSc, RN, SCM, OHNc, NPDip, respiratory specialist nurse, West Suffolk HospitalSponsored by an education grant from Allen & HanburysThis guide explains how different types of inhaler devices work, and describes their benefits and drawbacks.

  • Asthma and womenSubscription

    Clinical14 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 10

  • Asthma care in a school environmentSubscription

    Clinical14 September, 2000

    VOL: 96, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 43Caia Francis, BSc, MSc, is a project coordinator/research nurse, Division of Primary Health Care, University of Bristol, and a member of The Nursing Times Good Practice Network. For GPN details, tel: 020 7383 5865‘I didn’t know my asthma could be this good. I didn’t know that I could feel this well. I thought that was how my asthma was. I thought that was how it should be.’

  • The use of management plans in patients' control of asthmaSubscription

    Clinical22 March, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 12, PAGE NO: 8Teresa Burgoyne, RN, is respiratory nurse, Queen’s Medical Centre, NottinghamTeresa Burgoyne, RN, is respiratory nurse, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham

  • Improving the management of asthma in under-fivesSubscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 36

  • Patients with severe asthmaSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 49Linda Pearce, MSc, RN, RCM, NPracDip, is respiratory specialist nurse, West Suffolk Hospital, Bury St EdmundsThere are 3.4 million people in the UK with asthma. A small proportion of these - an estimated 5% - are difficult to treat due to breakthrough symptoms despite best current therapy.

  • Managing asthma in adolescenceSubscription

    Clinical20 September, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 38, PAGE NO: 40Pat MacDonald, BA, RGN, RSCN, HV, is respiratory nurse specialist, the Airways Clinic, St Helier Hospital, Carshalton

  • The role of anti-IgE in managing difficult-to-treat or severe asthmaSubscription

    Clinical1 October, 2001

    Linda Pearce, MSc, RN, SCM, OHNc, N Pract Dip.

  • A specialist asthma serviceSubscription

    Clinical21 March, 2002

    VOL: 98, ISSUE: 12, PAGE NO: 48

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