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Issue : August 2001

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  • A duty to reflect on practiceSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 39

  • A holistic approach to painSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 34 Valerie Howard, BSc, RN, RM, RNT, is a nurse tutor in palliative care, Northern Ireland Hospice

  • A non-pharmacological approach to managing breathlessnessSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 57

  • A practical guide to managing courseworkSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 65

  • A recipe for successSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 47

  • A systematic desensitisation programme for agoraphobiaSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 39

  • A vicious circle: visual impairment in people with learning disabilitiesSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 36Penelope Stanford, MSc, RGN, is a nurse teacher at the University of ManchesterGary Shepherd, BSc, is a student, at the University of ManchesterEyesight problems can be more prevalent in people with a learning disability than in the general population (Department of Health, 1995). It has been estimated, throughout the world, that 40% of people with a severe learning disability have experienced problems with their eyesight (Kerr et al, 1996).

  • Best practice in weaningSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 56

  • Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy - 2Subscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 45JANET COPP, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, HAEMATOLOGY, OLDCHURCH HOSPITAL, ROMFORD, ESSEXIt is usual to perform a bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy together. The main reason for performing an aspiration without a trephine biopsy is to monitor disease response during a course of treatment, for example, acute 'leukaemia.

  • Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy - 3Subscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 43JANET COPP, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, HAEMATOLOGY, OLDCHURCH HOSPITAL, ROMFORD, ESSEXThroughout a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy procedure it is important that the nurse monitors the patient's pain and tolerance of the procedure. Some patients prefer to have sedation when undergoing the 'procedure.

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