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Issue : August 2001

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  • Managing extravasation injuries in preterm neonatesSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 40 VAL IRVING, RN, RM, BA, is sister/team leader, Neonatal Unit, Liverpool Women’s Hospital

  • Vacuum-assisted closureSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 51 HELENA BAXTER, MSc, RGN, is clinical nurse, specialist tissue viability, Tissue Viability Unit, Guy’s Hospital, London KATE BALLARD, BSc, RGN, is clinical nurse specialist, tissue viability, and clinical trials coordinator, Tissue Viability Unit, Guy’s Hospital, London

  • A duty to reflect on practiceSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 39

  • Non-healing leg ulcerationSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 49

  • Subarachnoid haemorrhage: managing complicationsSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 28Juliet Bostwick, MSc, RGN, is lecturer practitioner, Oxford Brookes University/Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS TrustMary Sneade, BA, RGN, RM, is assistant trial manager, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS TrustSubarachnoid haemorrhage - bleeding into the subarachnoid space around the brain - is usually the result of a burst cerebral aneurysm. It can require invasive treatment to manage some of the complications.

  • Making the most of modern matronSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 34

  • Paediatric discharge criteria lead to improved outcomesSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 30 Jessica Higson, BN, DipHE, RN, is senior staff nurse, Albert day unit, Royal Berkshire Hospital Rachael Bolland, MSc, BA, RSCN, is senior sister, Island day unit, The Hospital for Children, Great Ormond Street, London

  • End the turf war to lighten our loadSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 27Ami David, MSc RGN RM DN DNT RNTThe nursing news is still dominated by the thorny issue of recruiting from abroad, and trusts across the country are still sending senior staff to scour developing countries. But foreign recruitment is a short-term solution to a festering longer-term problem.

  • Reactions to topical medicaments and wound care productsSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 59 JUSTINE RATCLIFFE, RN, BA, is head of specialty, dermatology, Royal Bolton Hospital

  • A practical guide to managing courseworkSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 65

  • Traumatic wounds: local wound managementSubscription

    Clinical30 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 35, PAGE NO: 55

  • Nursing a patient after subarachnoid haemorrhageSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 36 Juliet Bostwick, MSc, RGN, is lecturer practitioner, Oxford Brookes University/Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS Trust Mary Sneade, BA, RGN, RM, is assistant trial manager, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS Trust Subarachnoid haemorrhage - bleeding into the subarachnoid space around the brain - usually occurs after the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm and affects about 7,000 people a year in the UK (Hutchinson et al, 1998). 

  • A holistic approach to painSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 34 Valerie Howard, BSc, RN, RM, RNT, is a nurse tutor in palliative care, Northern Ireland Hospice

  • Planning for a smooth dischargeSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 32 Mave Salter, MSc, RN, DNCert, DipCouns, CertEd, is a clinical nurse specialist, community liaison, The Royal Marsden Hospital, London

  • Respiratory nurse consultant: the role.Subscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 44JANE SCULLION, MSc, BA, RGN, is respiratory nurse consultant, Glenfield Hospital, and part-time clinical fellow, Aberdeen University Department of General Practice and Primary CareThe specifics of the role of a nurse consultant have been defined as expert practice, professional leadership and consultancy, education and training, service development and research and evaluation.

  • Homeward boundSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 38Susan Woodcock, RGN, is nurse manager, Beechwood Place Nursing Home, Malton, North YorkshireBeechwood Place is a privately owned nursing home in the Yorkshire town of Malton. It caters for 25 residents with various degrees of dependency. This year we were invited by North Yorkshire social services to join its step-down scheme, an initiative that aims to ease the pressure on beds at the local Malton, Norton and District Hospital.

  • Pulmonary hypertension: the role of specialist unitsSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 54

  • Harsh lesson for our teachersSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 31Alex Mathieson, RGN RNMHLearning disability nurses have always had a raw deal. Treated with disdain by nursing colleagues and suspicion by social care professionals concerned about them encroaching on to 'their' patch, they need all the friends they can get.

  • A non-pharmacological approach to managing breathlessnessSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 57

  • Patients with severe asthmaSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 49Linda Pearce, MSc, RN, RCM, NPracDip, is respiratory specialist nurse, West Suffolk Hospital, Bury St EdmundsThere are 3.4 million people in the UK with asthma. A small proportion of these - an estimated 5% - are difficult to treat due to breakthrough symptoms despite best current therapy.

  • Specialists must share knowledgeSubscription

    Clinical23 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 34, PAGE NO: 43

  • Psychiatric Lara Crofts? Forget itSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 31Phil Barker PhD RNThe prime minister invited some of the nation's health care leaders to a soirée recently. According to stories that filtered down from that evening, Tony Blair 'threw down the gauntlet' on the modernisation agenda and issued a gentle warning on the need for radical change in the health service. Everyone's coat is on a shaky nail in Blair's Britain.

  • Tackling aggression with oestrogenSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 34Mark GreenerDementia is often far from a silent decline into the characteristics of old age, as most nurses working with older people know only too well. Many patients with dementia show sexually, physically and verbally aggressive behaviours that complicate their management and may be distressing for health care professionals. However, treatment is often difficult.

  • The rheumatology community nurseSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 38

  • We should value the core skillsSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 40Elaine Ryder, MSc, BA, RGN, DN, CPT, CertEd, RNT, DNT, senior lecturer in primary and community health at Oxford Brookes UniversitySula Wiltshire, BA, PGDip(ed), RGN, RM, senior lecturer in primary and community health at Oxford Brookes UniversityElaine Ryder, MSc, BA, RGN, DN, CPT, CertEd, RNT, DNT, senior lecturer in primary and community health at Oxford Brookes University

  • Recognising the causes of delirium in older peopleSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 32 Alan Hughes, MBChB, MRCPsych, is consultant psychiatrist, senior citizens, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley

  • Dying with dignitySubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 36

  • A systematic desensitisation programme for agoraphobiaSubscription

    Clinical16 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 33, PAGE NO: 39

  • Nutrition and learning disabilitiesSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 48

  • A vicious circle: visual impairment in people with learning disabilitiesSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 36Penelope Stanford, MSc, RGN, is a nurse teacher at the University of ManchesterGary Shepherd, BSc, is a student, at the University of ManchesterEyesight problems can be more prevalent in people with a learning disability than in the general population (Department of Health, 1995). It has been estimated, throughout the world, that 40% of people with a severe learning disability have experienced problems with their eyesight (Kerr et al, 1996).

  • Hyperemesis gravidarum: a short case studySubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 55

  • Understanding empowermentSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 39 Elaine Ryder, MSc, BA, RGN, DN, CPT, CertEd, RNT, DNT, senior lecturer in primary and community health at Oxford Brookes University Sula Wiltshire, BA, PGDip(ed), RGN, RM, senior lecturer in primary and community health at Oxford Brookes University Empowerment is a word we hear a lot in today’s health service and one that has become a central tenet of health policy (Department of Health, 1997). 

  • Best practice in weaningSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 56

  • Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy - 3Subscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 43JANET COPP, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, HAEMATOLOGY, OLDCHURCH HOSPITAL, ROMFORD, ESSEXThroughout a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy procedure it is important that the nurse monitors the patient's pain and tolerance of the procedure. Some patients prefer to have sedation when undergoing the 'procedure.

  • Osteoarthritis: symptoms and nursing management

    Osteoarthritis: symptoms and nursing managementSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 34 Sarah Ryan, PhD, RGN, is consultant nurse in rheumatology, Haywood Hospital, North Staffordshire Hospital NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent Osteoarthritis used to be described as a wear-and-tear condition, but today it is more commonly referred to as joint failure. It is not simply an inevitable consequence of ageing but the reaction of a joint, or joints, to an insult or injury.

  • Racism in nursing: a critical realist approachSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 40 Barbara Condliffe, BA, Cert Ed, RGN, RM, RCNT, DN, is senior lecturer in adult nursing, Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College

  • A recipe for successSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 47

  • Energy balance, mood and behaviourSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 52

  • Bringing the bullies to bookSubscription

    Clinical9 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 32, PAGE NO: 33Tracy McFall BSc RGN OHNMost of us have worked with a bully at some point: a person who thinks it is reasonable to shout at staff, blow hot and cold from one day to the next or criticise without justification.

  • Critical care outreach team sees fall in cardiac arrestsSubscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 34

  • Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy - 2Subscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 45JANET COPP, CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, HAEMATOLOGY, OLDCHURCH HOSPITAL, ROMFORD, ESSEXIt is usual to perform a bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy together. The main reason for performing an aspiration without a trephine biopsy is to monitor disease response during a course of treatment, for example, acute 'leukaemia.

  • Improving the management of asthma in under-fivesSubscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 36

  • Caffeine addiction and its effectsSubscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 42 Simon Joseph, BSc, RMN, is a staff nurse, Oakwood House, Blackberry Hill Hospital, Bristol

  • Medication for schizophreniaSubscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 38Richard Gray, PhD, RN, is Medical Research Council fellow in health services research, Institute of Psychiatry, LondonSince antipsychotic drugs were introduced more than 50 years ago, mental health nurses have had an important role in helping patients to manage their medication. They administer drugs, educate patients on the likely effects - positive and negative - monitor side-effects and evaluate treatment responses.

  • Smash the 'club culture'Subscription

    Clinical2 August, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 31, PAGE NO: 33Ray Rowden, RGN, RMN, MHSMWe now know the full story of events at Bristol, and grim reading it is. The inquiry reminds us that this sorry tale goes far deeper than a collection of individuals in a trust - it is an indictment of the whole governance of the NHS and Department of Health.

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