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'Being a student nurse makes you grow up fast'

  • Comments (4)

I was watching some student nurses deliver some sensitive and effective care on a ward last week.

Their attitude to the patients was both respectful and compassionate. It made me think about this group and wonder how they must be experiencing the current media onslaught on nursing.

And the negative stories about nursing students which have been out in the last year or so  – reporting  a lack of compassion and a lack of numeracy skills. It’s hard work training to be a nurse – combining the dual demands of studying and practical placements.

It requires dedication and energy. And it is a challenge to be on the wards dealing with very sick patients, seeing things that your friends who are studying other subjects will very likely never see.

The majority of student nurses take on this challenge as young adults and as we know training as a nurse makes you grow up fast. At least when you get to your third year you begin to feel as if you know what you doing and you can take the variety of challenges in your stride more easily.

I am hoping the Student Nursing Times Awards which we have launched this year will go some way to supporting and celebrating the efforts of student nurses and all those involved in training the nurses of the future. 

If you are a student nurse in your third year, a mentor, lecturer or run the best nursing course then please take this opportunity to enter online by March 2nd.

  • Comments (4)

Readers' comments (4)

  • Anonymous

    I find that instructors at the nursing school I attend would rather have quiet students who hide all day instead of the ones who talk, are full of energy and ask questions. Im not surprised if the new graduates are lacking personality when instructors are known for making comments on patient behavior in front of students allowing them to think the behavior is acceptable.

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  • Anonymous

    Organisational culture and the attitudes of employers and senior staff seems to play a significant role on influencing student and staff performance. If this is poor and staff do not feel valued, listened to or have their needs met this could, in the long term stifle motivation and creativity leading to frustration and eventually complacency affecting the ability to care and the quality of work. in severe cases it leads to absenteeism putting further strain on the team which may already be short staffed. In its turn this can lead to depression, disengagement and burnout.

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  • Anonymous

    well i for one am delighted that these students have got the skills to show compassion. well done. student nurses today have a hard time not saying we didn't when i trained in 1983 (!) but the fact that this is a positive story for a change should be seen as that. Positive. i am quite sure that there are a lot of student nurses and newly qualified nurses who are sensitive, caring and compassionate. we just don't hear about them too often do we?

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  • Anonymous

    I have long thought the negative criticism of nurse training and indeed trainees has been over-exaggerated, unfair and discriminate. Another case of media induced hysteria. I have always met with enthusiasm, intelligence and above all compassion in the students that I have encountered, albeit few because I work on a small Oncology unit. I too trained in the early eighties but there were overambitious, confident and career driven nurses back then who lacked numeracy and hands on caring skills and worse still were void of compassion.

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