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Chief Nursing Officer’s Award

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Winner: Nicky Hepden Berkshire West PCT

Winner, in the inaugural year of this award, is Nicky Hepden (pictured). She helped set up – and now leads – the Baker Street Clinic, initially aimed at providing health services for people who were homeless and had difficulty accessing mainstream healthcare. The service has now expanded to include sex workers, hostel residents, those living in temporary accommodation and other ‘hard-to-reach clients’

Chief Nursing Officer’s Award

Winner: Nicky Hepden Berkshire West PCT

Winner, in the inaugural year of this award, is Nicky Hepden (pictured). She helped set up – and now leads – the Baker Street Clinic, initially aimed at providing health services for people who were homeless and had difficulty accessing mainstream healthcare. The service has now expanded to include sex workers, hostel residents, those living in temporary accommodation and other ‘hard-to-reach clients’.

Leading a small team of nurses, Nicky provides health assessments, health advice and public health education. The team also work as advocates between clients and primary care services, supporting them in accessing mainstream services.

Nominating her for the award, Anne Owens, director of clinical services for Berkshire West PCT, said Nicky had displayed significant personal commitment and motivation in establishing the service. ‘She has provided exemplary leadership to her team and engendered the same passion within them for delivering a high-quality service.’

The judges said Nicky had developed a sustainable service for some of the most challenged clients and praised her persistence, determination and commitment as well as ‘a strong business head’. One said: ‘She is a true nurse entrepreneur.’

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Highly commended

Joanne Coleman, Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust Highly commended
Joanne Coleman, modern matron at Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust, led the development of vascular nursing services across Gateshead, providing a patient-centred and multidisciplinary service and delivering clinically and cost-effective care for vascular patients.

A decade ago, the trust had no leg ulcer or coordinated vascular services, but vascular care is now offered to those with leg ulcers, diabetes, intermittent claudication, amputation as well as those at risk of aneurysm.

‘Joanne has consistently demonstrated her ability to deliver patient-centred, responsive and high-quality care for her patients,’ director of nursing, Shirley Richardson, said.

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Finalists

Bruce Armstrong, Basingstoke and North Hampshire NHSFoundation Trust
Bruce Armstrong leads clinical practice, education, audit and research in emergency medicine. He has led the development of the emergency practitioner role locally, implemented a nurse-led minor and major injury and illness service, and is a commissioned officer in the Territorial Army. ‘Bruce is a truly driven and inspirational leader,’ nurse director, Donna Green, said.


Carole Farrell, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
A nurse clinician working in breast medical oncology, Carole Farrell operates nurse-led management of patients with breast cancer, conducting clinical consultations and examinations, patient follow-up and independent prescribing. ‘Carole has worked tirelessly to develop and streamline service delivery to improve the management of patients with breast cancer,’ said director of nursing Alison Norman.


Mark Holland, Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust
Mark Holland is responsible for the delivery of Manchester’s dual diagnosis strategy. He delivers nurse-led clinics, conducts research, oversees training and education, and advises on co-morbidity issues. Describing him as a ‘pioneer’ in dual diagnosis work, director of nursing, David Hill, said he had ‘led by example, maintaining a caseload, and providing coaching, supervision and mentoring.’

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Judges

- Rachel Downey, editor, Nursing Times
- Chris Beasley, chief nursing officer for England, Department of Health
- Ros Moore, professional officer, Acute Care and Research, DH
- Lt Col Caroline Whittaker, Medical Evacuation Regiment, Territorial Army

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Sponsored by Territorial Army

The Territorial Army Medical Services provides a unique, spare-time activity for many skilled professionals from a wide range of nursing disciplines. It is an exciting challenge that allows nurses to practise their skills in different circumstances, as well as being great fun and an ideal environment in which to make new friends.

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