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Child Health Award

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Winner: Leeds Metropolitan University

Getting sorted – self-care workshops for young people with diabetes: This was a truly inspirational project in which young people researched, developed, implemented and evaluated a self-care programme for young people with diabetes. Executed entirely by themselves, with senior lecturer Liz Webster (pictured second from left) , the programme produced spectacular improvements in the confidence, self-esteem and communication skills of those involved. Following the workshops, they reported feeling more in control of their condition, more assertive and better able to communicate with others

Winner: Leeds Metropolitan University

Getting sorted – self-care workshops for young people with diabetes: This was a truly inspirational project in which young people researched, developed, implemented and evaluated a self-care programme for young people with diabetes. Executed entirely by themselves, with senior lecturer Liz Webster (pictured second from left) , the programme produced spectacular improvements in the confidence, self-esteem and communication skills of those involved. Following the workshops, they reported feeling more in control of their condition, more assertive and better able to communicate with others.

The judges commented on the ‘huge energy and enthusiasm’ surrounding this project and the personal transformation it had brought about. They were particularly impressed at the use of young people not only to research the subject matter for the workshops but also to lead the actual research process. ‘The work could easily be transferred to work with young people with conditions such as epilepsy or asthma,’ they said.

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Finalists

Acorns Children’s Hospice
Death and decisions – a holistic approach to the child and family from death to burial: This project developed clear guidelines around the care of a child and her or his family between death and the time of burial or cremation. The service sets out a consistent standard of care that can be understood and implemented by all members of the team.

Association for Children’s Palliative Care (ACT)
The ACT transition care pathway: A transition pathway was developed in response to increasing evidence of the unmet needs of young people living with a life-limiting condition into adult years. The work involved parents, professionals and young people sharing their experience to develop a resource to support young people, their families and health professionals as they move from child-centred to adult-oriented palliative care services.

Education and Resources for Improving Childhood Continence (ERIC)
Campaigns to improve water and toilet facilities and access for pupils in UK schools: A national public awareness campaign was staged to help improve children’s access to water and good toilet facilities while in school. Achieving impressive media coverage, its surveys, publicity drives, websites and political lobbying resulted in the Scottish Executive and the Welsh Office putting mains-linked water coolers in all schools and allowing water bottles on desks. Government guidelines on school toilet design and maintenance have also been published.

Salford PCT
Smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) programme with school-aged young people: This team took advantage of changes in NRT legislation allowing NRT to be prescribed for children over 12. The change gave the team the chance to target young people in secondary schools and provide NRT products, rather than just information and advice. Since setting up the programme, run by two school health teams in Salford, 150 young people have seen the nurses for help and support, 18 have successfully stopped smoking and several more have reduced the amount that they smoke.

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Judges

- Rosemary Rogers, projects director, Nursing Times
- Caroline Joyce, deputy director of nursing, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children
- Liz Fradd, independent consultant

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Sponsored by Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust is a national centre of excellence in the provision of specialist children’s healthcare, currently delivering the widest range of specialist care of any children’s hospital in the UK. Working in partnership with the UCL Institute of Child Health, it forms the largest paediatric research and teaching centre in the UK. The hospital provides national services and supports the healthcare of local children.

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