Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Can the flu jab give you the flu?

  • Comments (9)

Can the flu jab give you the flu? What do you think?

EXPERT COMMENT

“It is impossible to get flu from having the flu jab.

This is because the vaccine doesn’t contain any live viruses.

A very small number of people experience side effects that are similar to those of the flu, such as aching muscles, but this is simply your immune system responding to what it thinks is an attack from flu.”

NHS Employers’ ‘Mythbusters’ page

  • Comments (9)

Readers' comments (9)

  • Of course it can't! That's common sense!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • michael stone

    It is a strange one to pose.

    But, I am told that often placebo effects are as effective as the medicine. So, if someone really believes that having a flu jab will give him the flu, will he then suffer the same physiological effects as catching the flu ? Especially as 'a touch of flu' seems to describe just about any unknown 'minor flu-like symptoms', these days, in the' public mind'.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • The placebo effect is powerful but often not as effective as medicine as the media and others would like to suggest.
    One meta-analysis looked at as many trials which included both 'placebo' and 'no treatment' arms which they could find and found there to be no significant differences in measured outcomes. Many studies find some statistically significant differences but these are not clinically significant. Whilst others still have found some interesting placebo effects.
    It seems the placebo effects are probably much weaker and more fleeting. Certainly good point about 'a touch of flu' which some of us are guilty of using to describe the common cold or a cough especially in the case of 'freshers flu', and probably would be used by some to describe the immune response to the jab.
    I like the expert comment and have to go with that.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Daniella Pires

    Na I don't think it can give you the flu :) I have it because I'm asthmatic, and I have never had any problems with it.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    no way, but you can get a painful arm and funny looks from staff if you dont get it.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • michael stone

    If a vaccine contains no virus, it cannot give you the illness.

    But if a vaccine contains degraded virus, or 'all of the virus, but 'broken into bits', it is theoretically possible that an active virus could be re-formed in the body - ALMOST impossible, but not 100% 'beyond possible'.

    But I suspect there is no evidence to suggest that the flu jab gives people the flu: so the interesting question, is why do quite a lot of people, BELIEVE it 'gave me the flu'. The hopeless grasp of probablilities could be part of this, but a lot of people do beleive the jab can give them the flu.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Is anyone else fed up with hearing about flu@

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    This is worth a read if anyone is interested in a critical analysis.
    http://www.naturalnews.com/033447_Institute_of_Medicine_vaccines.html

    http://www.naturalnews.com/029641_vaccines_junk_science.html

    and this report which details all the various other adverse events apart from flu, including contracting viral meningitis:

    http://naturalnews.com/files/Adverse-Effects-of-Vaccines-Evidence-Causality.pdf

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • George Kuchanny

    One of my wife's ancestors started all this jab malarkey - chap by the name of Edward Jenner apparently. Many say that inummerable lives were saved. They probably were. But flu jabs? I understand that influenza mutates quite quicky unlike say, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. So the immunisation given by a jab is simply not as powerful a guarantee as it could be. The organic signature of a new strain of flu may be different enough to the strain used to produce the jab to cause the effect of no immunisation whatsoever. Hmm...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.