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Negative pressure wound system approved for high-risk surgical patients

  • 5 Comments

A single-use negative pressure wound therapy system has been approved for use on acute wounds and high-risk incisions and grafts.

The product allows effective fluid management directly through the dressing, eliminating canisters and expanding negative pressure to a wider number of patients.

“PICO” is now available throughout the European Union and was officially unveiled at the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) conference taking place in Brussels, Belgium 25-27 May.

The PICO system contains a disposable, one-button pump, coupled with an advanced dressing which negates the need for a bulky canister, simplifying NPWT.  The pump is pocket-sized for the utmost patient privacy and the innovative dressing can be worn up to seven days.

Professor Donald Hudson, Head of the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University of Cape Town, South Africa and Groote Schuur Hospital said: “A system like PICO that combines the clinical effectiveness of NPWT with the known benefits of advanced wound care dressings is an ideal solution for appropriate patients, especially those at high risk in the critical days following surgery.

“PICO opens up some very interesting possibilities in treating many kinds of small to medium sized wounds in both hospital and outpatient settings.”

  • 5 Comments

Readers' comments (5)

  • Richard White

    An excellent development which will enhance care (I have no vested interests). This should be carefully considered for immediate use on our wounded troops in Afghanistan (politicians please take note)Prof Hudson is quite correct. Shame that Cochrane reviews don't agree with the vast experience of clinicians. The question is, "will it get onto formularies and will Meds Management etc agree to it?"

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  • How will this compare with VAC dressings?

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  • Pauline Beldon

    I agree with Richard, this equipment provides the possibility for early discharge of patients with a sealed wound device. You would think a 'no- brainer'.
    Perhaps time Cochrane came down from the tower and got down and dirty with us on the shop floor? Hierachy of evidence is all well and good, but many of us realise its application within wound management precludes the very patients we should be investigating

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  • Negative Pressure dressings have been a great innovation to improve wound management for many patients with dehisced abdominal wounds or for those wounds that cannot be surgically close for whatever reason. Negative pressure has allowed the safe early discharge of many patients to the community, whilst facillitating better recovery of patients in their own homes it also helps to free up surgical beds. An import consideration for acute Trusts.
    Both Cochrane and many pharmacists fail to see the obvious clinical advantages of negative pressure dressings and perhaps they need a re-think. I think they would only have to l see the face of a patient that feels they have been rescued from a wet, smelly wound disaster to re-consider. Not likely from an ivory tower!
    Caroline Hughes

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  • this is an excellent product, easy to use and manageable at home. Is it available in MAlaysia

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