Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Nurses win award for pressure ulcer campaign

  • 4 Comments

Two tissue viability nurses have won an innovation award for a campaign that has reduced the occurrence of pressure ulcers significantly across almost all of their trust’s 16 wards.

“Realising improvements in this area is of real testament to our nursing team”

Catherine Morgan

Following the introduction of the “Ready to Roll” campaign last year at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital King’s Lynn Foundation Trust, 14 of 16 wards have achieved 100 consecutive days without pressure ulcers among patients.

Seven of these wards went on to reach 200 days free of pressure ulcers, and two wards achieved 300 days without one occurring.

The initiative uses the acronym ASKINS to reminds nurses of six components of care to help avoid bed sores.

pressure ulcer award

Michelle Porter and Jane Parker

These are assessment – using the Waterlow risk assessment tool – skin inspection, keep moving, incontinence and information, nutrition, and surface.

Nurses Jane Parker and Michelle Porter, who came up with the campaign, were named winners of the award for innovation in service development at this year’s

Nurses Jane Parker and Michelle Porter, who came up with the campaign, were named winners of the award for innovation in service development at this year’s Mölnlycke Health Care Wound Academy awards, which took place in London.

Ms Parker said: “Although Michelle and I implemented the Ready to Roll/ASKINS project, it would not have been successful without the continued support of the staff delivering the care and this is now a standard practice across the trust.

“Two particularly challenging wards due to the acuity of the patients – stroke and care of the elderly – have managed to achieve 200 consecutive days free from avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, which is such an achievement.”

“Two challenging wards…have achieved 200 consecutive days free from avoidable pressure ulcers, which is such an achievement”

Jane Parker

The trust’s director of nursing, Catherine Morgan, said: “The Ready to Roll campaign refocused our nurses on an incredibly painful and harmful condition.

“We set out to provide all of our patients with safe, compassionate care, and realising improvements in this area is of real testament to our nursing team, in particular our specialist tissue viability team,” she said.

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • Pussy

    Excellent! Don't forget to take off those TEDS and inspect those heels as well.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Why is this headline news? Pressure ulcers were seen as a sign of poor nursing and not tolerated by ward sisters. HCA's well placed to report initial problems so let's get into a routine of checking at least once daily and be proud of our caring profession not blowing the trumpet when we get it right . It should always be right!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Pussy

    Anon 1:20 Actually you are quite right,it's like telling a photographer how to take a photo but there are so many sores now and prevention is seen as something special.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Well done girls!!! I am very proud of you, and us all as an Organisation! x

    Unlike the comments left by people I can only presume have nothing better to do than sit around moaning and complaining with their sarcastic and juvenile comments, people who probably have either no healthcare experience whatsoever, or have done but 100 years ago and are so out of touch with todays practice that their opinions are actually laughable. If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say it, I say.

    I think as will many that pressure area care is something special and although our profession should always get it right, with increasing problems and pressure within the NHS, we don't. Everything is so focused on negativity nowadays, and the putrid smell of low morale everywhere, a little positivity is a breath of fresh air!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.

Related Jobs