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Do nurses need to be taught to introduce themselves?

  • Comments (11)

Nurses and other frontline NHS staff are being asked to tell their patients their name, as part of a campaign launched by a terminally ill doctor on Twitter.

The “hello-my-name-is” campaign was started by Dr Kate Granger after she became frustrated with the number of staff who failed to introduce themselves to her when she was an inpatient.

Speaking to Nursing Times, she said: “I was approached by so many nurses who just came up to me and didn’t introduce themselves and I had to keep asking what their name was”.

She added: “It is an easy free thing to do that doesn’t take 10 seconds.”

 

Read more: Tell patients your name, tweets doctor turned inpatient

 

What do you think?

Do nurses always introduce themselves or is this sometimes missed?

  • Comments (11)

Readers' comments (11)

  • polly mitchell

    I see this all the time! It is important and it's simple! Its obviously not just nurses that do this! It is just talking to people as you would like to be spoken to - pretty basic. I think it is also part of feeling important, sometimes Docs introduce themselves to promote a sense of grandeur - you miss the name and hear about six titles! Nurses have a LOT to be proud of and so saying 'hello my name is X and I'm your nurse' should feel good!

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  • Anonymous

    what do people say to each other when they shake hand?

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  • Anonymous

    This is already being discussed elsewhere! Same posts!

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  • I agree it it vital and also state your role - particularly as we have people working in lots of diverse roles eg HCAs, HCSWs, nurse and paramedic practitioners-vital to say who you are and your job title so there is no confusion

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  • Anonymous

    respect for another, building up trust and confidence - all part of a basic pattern of human behaviour. why should a patient let a complete stranger touch them without knowing who they are and their role and purpose? you wouldn't accept it outside in the street so why in a hospital?

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  • I agree with this article ,totally. In my second year ,as a student nurse, I had the opportunity to observe all members of the Multidiscilinary Team interact with patients. It was quite shocking and extremely disappointing that nurses and health care assistants were the group least likely to introduce themselves to patients.

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  • Anonymous

    Funny that nurses can be blamed for all the evils within Hospitals and healthcare settings including all the poor care that exists everywhere; have their pay frozen for years, pension funds raided to pay the deficit and work to the point of dropping from exhaustion and stress.......and yet not one takes to the streets in protest. Yet they don't say 'hello' properly (only in some areas as I have never come across this as a patient) and everyone jumps on board to express mock outrage. That explains a lot.


    Marie Anna | 17-Sep-2013 5:05 pm

    "shocking and extremely disappointing"

    Why don't you complain to your uni and have them all taken out and shot?! They are obviously not fit to look after people.

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  • Anonymous

    Nurses don't introduce themselves because they are too frazzled to stop and tick yet another box and actually they are already beyond formalities because they have started to care for that patient as their own family before they came in the door, and HCA's don't introduce themselves because its usually met with what is a HCA, they don't want to lie and call themselves nurses but the do nurse and they want a title to be proud of like nursing assistant or auxiliary nurse. Doctors introduce themselves because they are never there and it is not obvious what they will be doing to the patient.

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  • I'll be honest and admit that I don't always introduce myself, on the ward - or in Sainsbury's if I strike up a conversation with someone. Sometimes it just feels rather odd, however, after reading Kate Grangers article I will. Yes, I think it should be taught. When I trained many moons ago we weren't taught to ask for consent either - I do that now though.

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  • Anonymous

    I always introduce myself. I wouldn't dream of nursing someone without doing this. It's what used to be called "good manners". I find out out lots of details about my patients because whilst I am "doing" I am also talking and listening and people usually love to talk back to me. I discovered things about patients during one intervention that other nurses had not known after 3 or 4 home visits. That's because I'm nosy! The downside is that I have in the past been criticised for spending too much time with patients, for poor time management, etc etc. Having said that, I don't think that nurses who don't introduce themselves are "bad". In hospitals, nurses are lucky if they get to loo at times, so forgetting to introduce themselves to patients is understandable. Nurses are treated like s... most of the time so that's probably why in some cases their "bedside manners" are missing. Being constantly undervalued, abused and mistreated must have a knock on effect.

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