Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Experienced but going nowhere

  • Comment
I have a degree in nursing practice, experience in Theatres as F grade in anaesthetics/recovery from 1996 - 2001. I was a G grade clinical skills tutor to medical students between 2001-2004, G grade on acute admission ward 1995-1996 and teaching nursing and Medevac in South Sudan field hospital 2004-2005.

I have a degree in nursing practice, experience in Theatres as F grade in anaesthetics/recovery from 1996 - 2001. I was a G grade clinical skills tutor to medical students between 2001-2004, G grade on acute admission ward 1995-1996 and teaching nursing and Medevac in South Sudan field hospital 2004-2005.

I now teach year one and two medical students and bank in A&E but would like to consolidate my skills but not sure where to go from here. Could you suggest anything as they have cancelled professional development for 12 months where I am based so I feel I going nowhere now.

Answer:

You are well qualified and have an interesting and somewhat varied depth of experience.

It would seem that the first thing you should do is to have a hard think about your career direction;

  • Do you like working in anaesthetics/recovery and would like to continue in this area?
  • As you have been in theatres would you like theatres work in a 'scrubs' capacity?
  • As you have done so much teaching, is this the path that you would like to follow?
  • Are there other areas of nursing that you have thought about?

It is important that you choose a field that you actually, deep-down, enjoy. A person who really likes what they do and is paid to do something that they like doing is not only fortunate but will also give that little bit extra and thus be successful.

From reading it seems to me that teaching has been a feature of you career so far. Presumably therefore, your superiors must think that you are good at it - and this is half the battle. But do you get a 'buzz' from teaching?

I note that professional development has been cancelled for 12 months but does this only apply to Salford Royal Hospitals Trust. If so have you thought of taking you talents elsewhere - to another trust or to the private sector? You may discover fresh openings if you make appropriate approaches.

Hopefully my comments are helpful but please don't hesitated to get back to me.

Best wishes

Tim Dotchin

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.