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Ezesomaga Ejimogu

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Comments (42)

  • Comment on: 'Rotate roles to ensure we treat both mental and physical health'

    Ezesomaga Ejimogu's comment 23 July, 2012 10:54 pm

    While there may be obvious advantages inherent in nurses acquiring basic knowledge and skills in both general and mental health nursing, we all need to carefully examine what we wish for. Does a mental health nurse wish to have, for instance, wound care knowledge and skills required to manage non-complex wounds, prevent and treat pressure sores? Or does he/she want to work on an orthopedic ward and take charge of the shift? There is a big difference between the two. They are different specialties for a reason. Perhaps we need to re-examine the reasons for the separations.

    In my experience as a mental health nurse, the non-mental health nursing knowledge and skills that I and some of my colleagues long for are basic. Certainly not enough to take charge of a general ward, of any specialty.

    A danger in seeking expert knowledge in both areas is that one spreads oneself too thin, and your guess is as good as mine on who suffers the consequences. Another danger is that the nurse becomes 'only a nurse', as some think, ready and waiting (albeit unwittingly) to be uprooted from his/her usual area of practice to plug a shortfall in another area. This is cheaper for the organisation, but is it how one would like to be employed, is it safe for all concerned?

    I have not seen the research cited by the author of this article. It will be interesting to know how many of the participating nurses wanted a long term arrangement of this sort. Were they even asked? The author of this article seems to imply that it is a desirable long term arrangement. In my opinion, it is a cost saving measure with hyped-up benefits to nurses and patients.

    For those in support of this arrangement, I urge you to think it through very carefully before you lend further voice to it. Do you want to run a general ward if you are a mental health nurse, or vice versa, or do you want enough knowledge and skills to manage non-complex cases beyond your usual area of practice? If it is the former, then raise your voice in support of the proposal. If it is the latter, you do not need a permanent arrangement of this sort. There are short in-service courses for either area to take advantage of.

  • Comment on: Too many nurse leaders in 'quasi-medical' roles, says prominent doc

    Ezesomaga Ejimogu's comment 3 June, 2012 0:34 am

    Sir John's proposal seems to me like professional protectionism in disguise. Unless of course he is suggesting that, alongside the Ward Sister role, remuneration should be rising up to Agenda For Change Band 9. And the Ward Sisters should be sponsored by their employers in gaining more relevant knowledge and skills. This is given that the GP can earn six figure salary. Hence the aspiration of newly qualified doctors (at least for some).

    I am sure Sir John is not suggesting, given his experience and high intellect, that nurses who aspire to gain more knowledge and skills in order to progress (in clinical practice) higher than Band 6 (Ward Sister) are wasting resources, are not impacting positively on care delivery, are not good role models to other nurses. I am sure Sir John is not suggesting that the nurses' career progression should be capped at Band 6 (Ward Sister).

    Sir John really needs to clarify his proposal a little further.

  • Comment on: Huge fall in nurses dropping out of nursing courses

    Ezesomaga Ejimogu's comment 28 September, 2011 3:45 pm

    To anonymous --'' I was feeling quietly optimistic until I read the last couple of paragraphs : ''.

    I share your optimism but probably for a different reason. That fewer nursing students are dropping out suggests that more commitment has been squeezed out of the students. And the article relates this to increased support from the universities and more rigorous selection process. However, there is another factor not acknowledged in the article, and that is the reduced availability of alternatives. The economic situation has whittled down alternatives. When you add these two factors, it is not surprising that you get a committed student group, and potentially, more committed and capable nurses.

    To the last two paragraphs of the article, I think that the reduced number of places may be a good thing for the profession. This is on the basis that scarcity usually breeds appreciation. With regards to nursing, more appreciation of what we do and the skills we apply to it. I will expect this from the patients, public, other healthcare professionals, the government, and most of all the nurses themselves.

    This is why I wrote earlier that our reasons for optimism may not be the same.

  • Comment on: Huge fall in nurses dropping out of nursing courses

    Ezesomaga Ejimogu's comment 28 September, 2011 1:53 pm

    To anonymous --'' I was feeling quietly optimistic until I read the last couple of paragraphs : ''.

    I share your optimism but probably for a different reason. That fewer nursing students are dropping out suggests that more commitment has been squeezed out of the students. And the article relates this to increased support from the universities and more rigorous selection process. However, there is another factor not acknowledged in the article, and that is the reduced availability of alternatives. The economic situation has whittled down alternatives. When you add these two factors, it is not surprising that you get a committed student group, and potentially, more committed and capable nurses.

    To the last two paragraphs of the article, I think that the reduced number of places may be a good thing for the profession. This is on the basis that scarcity usually breeds appreciation. With regards to nursing, more appreciation of what we do and the skills we apply to it. I will expect this from the patients, public, other healthcare professionals, the government, and most of all the nurses themselves.

    This is why I wrote earlier that our reasons for optimism may not be the same.

  • Comment on: Shake-up for blood pressure diagnosis backed by NICE

    Ezesomaga Ejimogu's comment 25 August, 2011 1:08 pm

    I am inclined to believe that 24-hour home monitoring will yield more accurate readings. All due to the Hawthorne effects experienced by patients. However, it would be interesting to know the percentage of patients for whom a trip to the G.P is a momentary escape from from a pressured home environment. Never the less, 24-hour monitoring seems to be a step forward.

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