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Issue : February 2001

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  • Emergency contraception and teenage sexualitySubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 05, PAGE NO: 40

  • Flu in the community: nursing managementSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2001

    Author

  • Bladder retrainingSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 05, PAGE NO: 45RAY ADDISON, NURSE CONSULTANT IN BLADDER AND BOWEL DYSFUNCTION, MAYDAY HEALTHCAREJANE LOPEZ, HONORARY NURSE SPECIALIST/NURSE LECTURER, KINGSTON UNIVERSITYFor patients diagnosed with detrusor instability (motor urgency) or sensory urgency, a bladder retraining programme should be considered. The aims of bladder retraining are to increase bladder capacity and to extend the period of time between voiding.

  • Action research in rehabilitation care for older peopleSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 05, PAGE NO: 37

  • Detaining patients: a study of nurses' holding powersSubscription

    Clinical1 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 05, PAGE NO: 38Olajide Ajetunmobi, MBBS, MRCPsych, is specialist registrar in psychiatry, Brandon Mental Health Unit, Leicestershire and Rutland Healthcare NHS TrustUnder section 5(4) of the 1983 Mental Health Act, psychiatric nurses have the power to detain psychiatric inpatients who are liable to harm themselves or others. Although nurses generally agree on the usefulness of this power, studies have found that they rarely use it.

  • A guide to female urinalsSubscription

    Clinical8 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 7 Joan McIntosh, RGN, is an independent research nurse, Elmdon, Essex

  • Body parts and the lawSubscription

    Clinical8 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 32 Sue Woodcock, MA (medical ethics and law), BSc, RGN, is clinical development sister and renal nurse, University College London Hospitals NHS Trust For thousands of years the human body has been considered inviolable (Titmuss, 1997). As a symbol it reflects the society in which it exists, echoing its institutions and ideologies (Gold, 1996).

  • Female urinals offer a valuable alternative in continence careSubscription

    Clinical8 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 1Eileen ShepherdImagine you are in pain and you cannot tolerate even the smallest change in position. Then to compound your problems you get the urge to pass urine. You hold on for as long as you can but eventually you ask for a bedpan. The nurse brings a standard hospital bedpan, but trying to sit on it only intensifies the pain and eventually you give up. The nurse suggests a catheter as the only alternative, and reluctantly you agree.

  • PromoCon 2001: an integrated resource for continenceSubscription

    Clinical8 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 10Helen White, RGN, RHV, is director of PromoCon 2001 and nurse researcher, continence, Northumbria Healthcare NHS TrustPromoCon 2001 is a national initiative that aims to promote continence and product awareness through its work with the main continence organisations and the Disabled Living Centres Council.

  • Female devices: are your patients missing out?Subscription

    Clinical8 February, 2001

    VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 3

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