Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Female urinals offer a valuable alternative in continence care

  • Comment

VOL: 97, ISSUE: 06, PAGE NO: 1

Eileen Shepherd

Imagine you are in pain and you cannot tolerate even the smallest change in position. Then to compound your problems you get the urge to pass urine. You hold on for as long as you can but eventually you ask for a bedpan. The nurse brings a standard hospital bedpan, but trying to sit on it only intensifies the pain and eventually you give up. The nurse suggests a catheter as the only alternative, and reluctantly you agree.

Imagine you are in pain and you cannot tolerate even the smallest change in position. Then to compound your problems you get the urge to pass urine. You hold on for as long as you can but eventually you ask for a bedpan. The nurse brings a standard hospital bedpan, but trying to sit on it only intensifies the pain and eventually you give up. The nurse suggests a catheter as the only alternative, and reluctantly you agree.

Yet nurses do have an alternative for female patients who have to use a bedpan. There are a variety of female urinals marketed in the UK. Women have a wide choice of products to meet their specific needs. In this issue of NT plus on continence we review the range of female urinals available and how these can improve the quality of life for our patients and promote more independent living. All nurses, including those in acute clinical areas, should take time to review these products and consider the potential benefits they have for all patients.

The new guidelines for preventing infections associated with the insertion and maintainance of short-term indwelling urethral catheters in acute care has promoted some discussion among continence advisers. Any guidance that improves practice is welcome, but infection is only one aspect of the management of a catheter, and it is hoped that the expertise of continence advisers will be utilised by nurses in acute care, in implementing this guidance.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.