Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Half of adults in clinic had no food allergy

  • 2 Comments

Half of all adults referred to a specialist clinic with suspected food allergies were found to have no food allergy, according to research.

A study looked at 214 adults referred to a German outpatient allergies clinic at a university hospital with suspected food allergies.

Following comprehensive diagnostics, including allergological history-taking, IgE serology and challenge tests, only 51 per cent were found to have an IgE-mediated food allergy. Almost half of this group had previously experienced food-induced anaphylaxis.

The authors conclude that only comprehensive testing can identify those patients prone to potentially-fatal anaphylaxis while protecting others from needless dietary restrictions and excessive concerns about a ‘non-existent’ allergy.

Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (2008) 105: 715-23

 

  • 2 Comments

Readers' comments (2)

  • Unfortunately, this study fails to address food intolerance. Food intolerances are not allergies. Lactose intolerance is a perfect example. If someone is reacting to a certain food, particularly with anaphylaxis, regardless of whether it's allergy or not, it's hardly "needless dietary restrictions and excessive concerns about a 'non-existent' allergy". If a food makes a person feel ill, they should not eat it... whether the cause for the reaction is known or not. To advise otherwise is to endanger the safety of patients.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I have unfortunately had bad experiences with GP's in ref to my sons food allergies. The surgery at first refused to test him for a variety of foods which i supspected he was allergic to. Not until I complained did they take me seriously. In the end after a consulation and testing my child was found to be allergic to all nuts (not just peanuts)at a high level, white fish, all seeds, pollen/grass, tomatoes and a variety of other things.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.