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Hospital discharge is still putting patients at risk

  • Comments (9)

There is more to planning a hospital discharge than ordering medications and booking the transport. All the care and treatment that patients receive while in hospital can be compromised if their discharge home leaves them vulnerable.

Research out this month shows that this aspect of care is still being neglected in some areas, leaving patients at increased risk of being readmitted to hospital.

A survey by Healthwatch of 3,000 patients found that many were not involved in decisions about going home and that often they and their families were not aware of extra support they would need.  

Communication between hospitals and community providers was found to continue to be an issue, with information not being passed on and services not being set up.

The declining number of district nurses is putting huge pressure on care being provided in the community so it is not surprising that some patients find themselves falling through a hole in the net of care once they are back home.

The authors of the Healthwatch report call for better communication between hospital and community providers. While this is needed, and will help to improve this issue, if the number of community nurses continues to be insufficient then all the hard work put into patients’ recovery is put at risk by their discharge home.

 

  • Comments (9)

Readers' comments (9)

  • michael stone

    http://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h4244

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  • Anonymous



    michael stone | 8-Aug-2015 11:42 am


    ?? ??????? ??????

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  • Anonymous

    Michael stone

    musati kudyetsa yothawathawa

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  • Anonymous

    michael stone | 8-Aug-2015 11:42 am


    http://www.herodote.net/almanach-ID-1497.php

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  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 8-Aug-2015 8:45 pm
    Anonymous | 8-Aug-2015 8:48 pm
    Anonymous | 8-Aug-2015 8:51 pm

    Out of interest, did any of you look at the BMJ article the link is to ? - Dr David Oliver's piece titled:

    David Oliver: Who is to blame for older people’s readmission?

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  • Anonymous

    michael stone | 9-Aug-2015 12:15 pm

    as a matter of interest how many surgical interventions have you carried out in the last 24 hours!

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  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 9-Aug-2015 9:40 pm

    None.

    And your answer to my question is ?

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  • Anonymous

    Michael - the link is to a subscription site.

    The rest of you - WTF? Only nurses can comment here? Only nurses are allowed to be interested in the nursing profession? If you don't like what Michael Stone says then either ignore it or post a considered, useful response.

    My own view is that the nursing profession needs all the help and support it can get - NMC, RCN, Unison, etc. are not helping. The DH and NHSE are not helping. The BMA is certainly not helping. And, I've have to say, nurses here are not helping themselves - these comments get read by a wide range of people, people who COULD make a difference - so make them count!

    Back to this particular story - this matters! All the work of getting somebody straightened out can be, and often is, wasted by a bad discharge. What's YOUR opinion, what ideas do YOU have to improve things?

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  • Anonymous

    Hi

    having recently been involved in a relatives discharge from hospital ( i'm a nurse too ) i was pleased to see my 90 year old grandmother have a full physio assessment, and an OT assessment. The doctors prescribed her medication and the drugs arrived on the ward in time for her going home. The only issue was that the GP letter was not given to her at discharge, thus causing problems over the re-ordering of oramorph. However this was sorted out, quite quickly.

    Team working is the key, and discharge planning begins on admission. I have worked on an acute oncology ward and i can honestly say we never had re-admissions because we planned, and liaised very effectively on any patient discharged, often ringing the patient the next day to ensure things were still ok and that they had got home safely. The systems are failing in some area's and to be honest i would blame lack of staff, standards will fall if you don't have the correct level of man power in any ward environment. There pressure for bed space, will also have a bearing.....pushing patients home when really they need more social input before the transfer home is safe!

    The NMC do nothing in my view to support or help nursing in its current situation.......

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