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How can you recover if you are tired?

  • Comments (6)

One night you can manage but after a few nights short of sleep you feel jaded and don’t think and respond as well as you would like.

Sleep is important and even more so when you are ill. A recent study found that patients with heart failure who had a history of sleeping badly had a doubled risk of being admitted to hospital compared to those with a normal sleep pattern.

This Swedish study presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting earlier this month concluded that we should be asking patients more about how they sleep as it is an important part of their recovery. Those identified as bad sleepers need to have the reasons explored and help with sleep hygiene including how they prepare to sleep. Otherwise poor sleeping may be linked to stress or worry or to medication, issues which can be addressed

As well as asking patients about their sleep history, nurses can help patients in hospital to sleep as well as they can with many small but effective measures. Making sure that wards are kept quiet, that staff talk and walk softly, that visitors to the ward are respectful of patients’ rest, and that patients are left to sleep in if they can and want to. Most people would not get up at 6am every morning so why would they want to do it in hospital? This study confirms that poor sleep hampers recovery. We all know the importance of sleep – let’s make sure we act on it.

  • Comments (6)

Readers' comments (6)

  • Anonymous

    I one works getting up at 6am or earlier is not unusual !

    Many sleep all night wake and complain the y "have not slept a wink" The answer for these people is to awake them every hour to remind them they were sleeping !

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  • The increased visiting times (we are now open visiting from 10am to 8pm) means that the majority of patients are getting little or no sleep during the day.

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  • Anonymous

    Saul Richardson | 22-Apr-2014 10:23 am

    We had open visiting until the infection control card overruled the any benefit of open visiting. You could research that notion and put a case forward.

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  • Anonymous

    hmmm, yes, of course we will assist when possible, maybe our managers will assist with our sleep patterns too...

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  • Anonymous

    I work on night duty and have to do hourly rounds and each time you enter patients room you wake the patients up. If you don't you are told that you have not done the hourly round and patient complain that they haven't sleep all night.

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  • Anonymous

    Anonymous | 2-May-2014 9:56 am

    not sure what sort of ward and cases you have. but hourly really does sound excessive.

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