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Infection Control Award

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Winner: Swansea NHS Trust

The value of an infection-reduction programme in reducing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in patients receiving haemodialysis: Winner of the infection control category is Swansea NHS Trust, presented by Jan Price (pictured right) and Delyth Davies (pictured left), for a far-sighted project aimed at reducing the incidence of S. aureus in patients on haemodialysis

Winner: Swansea NHS Trust

The value of an infection-reduction programme in reducing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in patients receiving haemodialysis: Winner of the infection control category is Swansea NHS Trust, presented by Jan Price (pictured right) and Delyth Davies (pictured left), for a far-sighted project aimed at reducing the incidence of S. aureus in patients on haemodialysis.

The infection control team worked collaboratively with renal unit staff, implementing measures to reduce the incidence of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA bacteraemia. The team standardised procedures to manage vascular access lines, introduced a vascular line management audit and MRSA screening, and opened a dedicated line insertion room. As a result the quarterly rates of MSSA and MRSA bacteraemia have fallen from over 400 and over 350 respectively per 100,000 bed days in 2004 to 42 per 100,000 bed days by 2007.

Following this, outcomes for patients on haemodialysis improved while close collaboration between the two teams raised awareness and improved infection control standards.

‘This nurse-led project started before targets to reduce healthcare-associated infections were set,’ the judges said. ‘The work has made a demonstrable difference and could easily be replicated in other critical care units.’

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Finalists

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Introduction of a vascular access team: A centralised dedicated team responsible for all aspects of central-line insertion was set up, aimed at reducing the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and to provide a holistic approach to care.


Carmarthenshire NHS Trust
Achieving our infection reduction target for Clostridium difficile: A multidisciplinary team (consultant microbiologist, infection control nurse and coordinator, doctor, pharmacist and others) was set up to reduce C. difficile rates across the trust. Both infection rates and expenditure on antibiotics fell significantly as a result.


Milton Keynes Hospital NHS Trust
Infection patrol: A traffic-light colour system was designed to assess and indicate to staff and patients the level of risk an individual faces from infection associated with healthcare. The system is put in place from the very first episode of patient care with a newborn baby and applies to patients receiving care at home as well as in hospital.


Swindon and Marlborough NHS Trust
Improving patient safety and organisational efficiency through effective outbreak management: The team implemented a proactive and corporate approach to the management and containment of outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis. Incidence was reduced as a result, as was the number and duration of ward closures due to infection.

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Judges

- Eileen Shepherd, assistant clinical editor, Nursing Times
- Tracey Gauci, nursing officer for communicable disease, Welsh Assembly Government
- Judy Potter, senior nurse, infection control, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital and chairperson, Infection Prevention Society

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Sponsored by JohnsonDiversey

JohnsonDiversey has worked together with the healthcare community for over 50 years. Our joint aim has been the continuous improvement in standards of general and personal hygiene. This area constantly throws up new challenges and has received a high public profile. The infection control nurse is at the forefront of the battle to meet these challenges and that is why JohnsonDiversey is proud to be the sponsor of this category.

Supported by the Infection Prevention Society, formerly ICNA

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