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Issue : Intermittent self catheterisation

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  • Intermittent self catheterisation

    Intermittent catheterisation: Making the right choiceSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Intermittent self catheterisation (ISC) offers control, independence and, ultimately and most importantly, a better quality of life for patients. Its introduction in the early 1970s revolutionised the way in which patients with bladder dysfunction could be managed.

  • Consultant nurse Daphne Colpman explains the function of the bladder and when it becomes necessary for intermittent catheterisation.

    Reasons for intermittent catheterisationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Consultant nurse Daphne Colpman explains the function of the bladder and when it becomes necessary for intermittent catheterisation.

  • The pros and cons of indwelling and intermittent catheterisation and how to decide which method is best for a particular situation

    Comparing indwelling and intermittent catheterisationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Continence advisor Kate Welford explains the pros and cons of indwelling and intermittent catheterisation and how to decide which method is best for a particular situation

  • Things to keep in mind when deciding whether a patient is suitable for intermittent self catheterisation.

    Principles of patient assessmentSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Urology continence nurse specialist Frances Roberts discusses things to keep in mind when deciding whether a patient is suitable for intermittent self catheterisation.

  • Standard length intermittent catheters must always be used for men (National Patient Safety Agency, 2009) and size 12Ch or 14Ch should be used for bladder drainage, unless otherwise stated. The Royal College of Nursing (2008) suggested health professional

    Male intermittent self catheterisationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Independent nurse prescriber Gillian Nottidge describes the proceedure and considerations for intermittent self catheterisation in men.

  • The idea of performing intermittent self catheterisation (ISC) can be daunting for some women. They may have never examined their genitalia with a mirror and may be lacking in knowledge about their own anatomy. Patients need information on basic anatomy a

    Female intermittent self catheterisationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Senior urogynaecology nurse specialist Angie Rantell explains the proceedure and considerations for intermittent self catheterisation in women.

  • Allow patients to effectively conduct intermittent self catheterisation.

    The importance of patient information and educationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Urology continence nurse specialist Frances Roberts explains the information and education required to allow patients to effectively conduct intermittent self catheterisation.

  • Problems that may occur during intermittent self catheterisation and their remedy.

    Common problems with intermittent self catheterisationSubscription

    Clinical12 October, 2010

    Director of continence services Ann Yates describes problems that may occur during intermittent self catheterisation and their remedy.