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NMC Revalidation: FAQs

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Revalidation will affect all nurses and midwives working in the UK. Find out how the process of renewing your NMC registration is changing and why.

Nursing Times Learning can help you meet the NMC Revalidation standards online, as well as boost your skills and knowledge in fundamental and complex nursing care.

Visit Nursing Times Learning here

Frequently asked questions:

Why is the NMC introducing revalidation?

What does revalidation involve?

What sort of activities count as continuing professional development?

What is participatory learning?

How will I demonstrate I have met my revalidation requirements?

Who should my confirmer be?

Do I have to keep a revalidation portfolio?

How do I submit my application to revalidate to the NMC?

How will I know when I am due to revalidate?

What happens if I don’t revalidate?

How will the NMC verify revalidations?

 

Why is the NMC introducing revalidation?

The NMC is introducing revalidation from April 2016 to:

  • Raise awareness of the Code and professional standards expected of nurses and midwives;
  • Provide you with the opportunity to reflect on the role of the Code in your practice as a nurse or midwife and demonstrate that you are “living” these standards;
  • Encourage you to stay up to date in your professional practice by developing new skills and understanding the changing needs of the public and fellow healthcare professionals;
  • Encourage a culture of sharing, reflection and improvement;
  • Encourage you to engage in professional networks and discussions about your practice;
  • Strengthen public confidence in the nursing and midwifery professions. 

 

What does revalidation involve?

In order to revalidate the NMC requires you to fulfil a number of requirements in each three-year registration period:

  • 450 practice hours over three years (or 900 hours if you have a dual registration as a midwife and a nurse)
  • 35 hours CPD including 20 hours participatory learning
  • A minimum of five pieces of practice-related feedback
  • A minimum of five written reflective accounts on your CPD, and/or practice-related feedback, and/or an event or experience in your own professional practice and how this relates to the Code
  • A reflective discussion with another NMC registrant covering your five written reflective accounts
  • Health and character declaration
  • Declaration that you have a profession indemnity arrangement
  • A third-party confirmation that you have complied with the revalidation requirements

You will be required to submit an application to revalidate before you can renew your registration at the end of your current three-year registration period. The application must be submitted by the first day of the month in which your registration expires.

You can find out more about the revalidation process in the NMC’s guidance: How to revalidate with the NMC

 

What sort of activities count as continuing professional development?

The NMC does not prescribe any particular activity to count towards your CPD requirement. However, it should be relevant to your current scope of practice as a nurse or midwife, so mandatory training that is not directly related to your practice (such as fire or health and safety training) should not be included.

The NMC has issued guidance on the types of activities you can undertake.

 

What is participatory learning?

Your 35 hours of CPD should include at least 20 hours of participatory learning activity. Participatory learning is taken with one or more professionals (these do not have to be health professionals) or in a larger group setting. The activity can take place in a physical environment such as a study group or conference, or a virtual environment such as an online discussion group.

Some CPD activities may include both individual and participatory learning. For example, you might undertake some online learning then get together with some colleagues to discuss how this might be used to improve practice in your work setting. In this case you should state the total hours of the activity and how many of these were participatory.

The NMC’s guidance on CPD activities also clarifies whether the examples on its list are individual or participatory.

 

How will I demonstrate I have met my revalidation requirements?

The NMC will ask you to make a declaration in your application to revalidate, stating that you have demonstrated to an appropriate confirmer that you have complied with the revalidation requirements. This involves having a discussion with your confirmer about your revalidation, in which you demonstrate that you have met all the revalidation requirements except the Professional indemnity arrangement, and the Health and character declaration; you will make these declarations when you submit your application. The NMC recommends you obtain confirmation in final 12 months of your registration.

 

Who should my confirmer be?

The NMC strongly recommends that you obtain confirmation from your line manager, even if your manager is not an NMC-registered nurse or midwife. If you have more than one line manager you only need to obtain one confirmation – you will need to decide which is the most appropriate to provide confirmation that you have meet your revalidation requirements.

If you do not have a line manager you need to decide who is best-placed to provide your confirmation. Wherever possible the NMC recommends this confirmer is an NMC-registered nurse or midwife; it is also helpful if the confirmer has worked with you or has a similar scope of practice.

If that is not possible you can seek confirmation from another health professional who you work with is regulated in the UK (such as a doctor, dentist or pharmacist).

If you don’t have a line manager or access to an NMC-registered nurse or midwife or another regulated health professional, check the NMC’s online confirmation tool [link:www.nmc.org.uk/confirmation] for further guidance

 

Do I have to keep a revalidation portfolio?

The NMC strongly recommends that you use a portfolio to keep evidence that you have met your revalidation requirements; this does not necessarily have to be an e-portfolio. If you already have a professional portfolio you can use this to store your revalidation evidence.

Your portfolio can be helpful in your discussion with your confirmer, and to store information you will need if the NMC selects you to verify the declarations on your application to revalidate.

The NMC has produced a checklist of the information you should have in your portfolio before you have your confirmation discussion or submit your revalidation application.

If you do keep an e-portfolio you should not store evidence of your reflective discussion or your confirmation here; these should be stored on paper.

 

How do I submit my application to revalidate to the NMC?

You will need to submit your application to revalidate through NMC Online. If you haven’t registered with NMC Online you can do so here. If you need help you can follow the NMC’s step-by-step guidance.

 

How will I know when I am due to revalidate?

Your revalidation application must be submitted by the first day of the month of your registration renewal date, which you can on NMC Online. The NMC will notify you at least 60 days before your application is due, either by email if you have registered with NMC Online, or by letter to your registered address.

Your online application opens 60 days before your revalidation application date. You will need to log in to your application via NMC online and address each of the revalidation requirements during this 60-day period; you do not have to complete the application in a single session – you can save your work to return to later. For details of the application process click here (page 31).

 

What happens if I don’t revalidate?

If you don’t submit your revalidation application in time your registration will lapse. If you want to return to the register you will need to apply for readmission; this process may take up to six weeks. If your registration lapses you are no longer a registered nurse or midwife. This means it is an offence to practise as a nurse or midwife, or to mislead people into thinking you are on the register.

If you submit your revalidation application in time but it is refused because you have failed to meet your revalidation requirements, you can appeal this decision within 28 days of the date on your decision letter. Details of how to appeal can be found here (page 39).

 

How will the NMC verify revalidations?

Every year the NMC will select a sample of nurses and midwives to provide further information to verify that the declarations they made on their revalidation application. If you are selected this does not necessarily mean there are any concerns about your application, and you can continue to practise while the NMC reviews the information you provide. For more information on verification click here (page 35/36).

 

Still unsure?

Found out more about revalidation on the NMC website

How to revalidate with the NMC

  • 15 Comments

Readers' comments (15)

  • this is going to be a waste of time for everyone.

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  • I agree with nurses keeping to a high standard of care and knowledge. What happens with the nurses like myself 65yrs and still able to work we will have to revalade after some of us being in the profession for 30-40yrs and might fail and after all those years of dedicating to nursing we might not be able to register so I understand when I read that the older nurse may give up because of revalidation, I am not sure what to do at present.

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  • When I qualified I registered 'for life', I understand that there were problems with this system and so periodic registration (3 yearly) was then introduced, this then became yearly.

    Firstly how is all that money form nurses being registered yearly being spent?

    Secondly, as the previous comment, I am nearing the end of my career and feel that all those years of sedicated service are now being called into question and I am having to 'jump throgh another hoop' just to continue working

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  • Here we go with more hoops. The previous comments made by colleagues prove it is just a money making scheme for the NMC. Why will we pay more admin staff, we need nurses on wards not more admin staff sat checking on us from their London palaces! We have lives outside of work as well. Happy to do the work and happy to have the online proof etc but having to ask patients for feedback and trouble other staff to have discussions with you when it is hard enough to get any input due to work pressures is crazy. It is time we put money into supplying good nurses and not shuffling more bits of paper around, that will never sort out the intelligent but don't care less minority who are happy to jump through admin hoops to hide their lack of compassion, empathy and care.

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  • this iniitiative would seem to be devisive and would go some way to alienating the NMC furhter from nurses. A lot of nurses comment upon their poor opinion of this body and suggest that they need to look like they are doing something to justify the huge hikes in registration fees.
    We need to concentrate all efforts in ensuring nursing staff are able to spend their time looking after the patients they are employed to care for and i cannot see this initiative promoting this.

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  • This does not ensure good compassionate nursing, going to a conference or paying lip service to this will not improve nursing care. Stop wasting money on bureaucratic nonsense.

    What effects quality of nursing is a lack of a supportive infrastructure and nurses constantly being taken away from nursing due to more and more paper work and doing jobs of porters and ward clerks as there aren't enough of them left due to cutting frontline support services and employing more mangers to manage targets.

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  • Bravo the luvvies at the NMC. You've really excelled yourself this time, it would indeed be funny if it wasn't so damned frustrating and annoying! Could I first echo the views of colleagues above, and add that this latest in a long line of beurocratic (excuse the spelling) paper shuffling exercises will clearly be effortlessly circumvented by the minority of 'incompetent' nurses, and cause needless additional aggravation for the rest of us, and at a time when qualified Nurses are needed more than ever. Post retirement from the NHS I've taken a brief break from nursing and was looking at returning part time, in part out of a belief in the principles of the NHS and a desire to do my own albeit small bit in keeping it above water and helping the public. But do you know what? I really can't be bothered as this latest pantomime is the final nail in the coffin of this old cynic's nursing career. Maybe I'm simply getting too just too old for such self justifying, unhelpful, bullsh@t.

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  • Susan Barton

    What happens if you emmigrate to the USA for example, would you still be required to revalidate every 3 years?

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  • Like we haven't got enough stress, paperwork, and legislation to work through on a daily basis that the NMC has this bright idea of forcing more pressure on us by making us reflect on our practice. We are conscious beings and are always reflecting on our practice as mature adults. This feels like a secondary school exercise and creates more jobs for the NMC, as surely they must have stacks of cash flow from the cost of yearly updating our pin numbers.

    Let's say there are approximately 325000 nurses practising in the UK. Each renewal costs £120. That's around £39,000,000. Yes, that's thirty-nine million pounds give or take a penny.

    £39,000,000. How does the NMC use this? Someone is living a life of luxury, working in a board room, not in a hospital environment.

    Dear NMC Sir, Madam - How about trying to make life a little easier for all the nursing slaves? Instead of introducing more legislation, barriers and homework for us.

    Ridiculous. It feels like the NMC are police. Yes, I agree to weeding out nurses that project poor practice and unsafe standards. Shouldn't mean the majority have to suffer from this nonsense.

    I believe this will backfire and many fantastic nurses will hang the white flag up and opt for a less stressful environment. I would love the NMC to work on the ward which I enjoy working with. Let's see if they can find time to sit on their backsides let alone writing reflective accounts about work in their leisure and recharge time.

    Maybe leave the nurses alone who have worked hard to gain their 'pin number' within the UK. Maybe place the revalidation process on nurses who come from other parts of the world who may need an update on how the UK works within a nursing context. Training standards will inevitably be different globally.

    The NMC to me feels like unfriendly gatekeepers.

    How about a revalidation vote? How about asking us if we would like to do this instead of just implementing it anyway.
    Shame on you NMC.

    Maybe look into staff retention and burnout within the health care sector. Instead of increasing our workload.

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  • I have tried so hard to remain in the profession after some very difficult experiences. After working as a Registered Nurse for 13 years I was bullied by my manager. I spoke up about it and then had to work with her for the first 15 months of a very long investigation. My life was a living hell but I did not turn a blind eye to it as patients were also being bullied by her. She was eventually moved and I was asked to act up to her role with no other nurse help and no teaching or support. I continued to ask for help and with the help of my union rep and the RCN I fought a very difficult legal battle which took its toll on my health as all the managers involved made my life difficult as they though I was a trouble maker for speaking up. It was eventually made impossible for me to stay in my job and I left. I recently started a new job but have so much to think about and have a health condition which is made worse by stress. I have decided not to revalidate as I believe I have worked hard enough and having to do this is the final straw. I need to stay well for the sake of myself, my husband, my son and my step children.

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  • I've always thought about becoming a Nurse and finally applied last year at age 28 and started my 3 year degree. However, after seeing everything Nurses go through, the content of the degree programme (too much academic stuff, too much self directed study etc) and now this Revalidation process...I am no longer looking forward to the idea of becoming a Nurse. I have made a decision to drop out of the course....I dont feel I can deal with the STRESS that Nurses endure. Maybe things will get better in future and I will apply then, but for now, I have given up. I would love it if Nursing was ''training'' at hospitals from Day 1, rather than all the essays, presentations, research etc. MUCH RESPECT to ALL the Nurses out there, You're troopers! And deserve so much better.

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  • Revalidation is pointless and so time consuming.I will probably leave nursing taking 28 years of experience with me rather than filling in rediculous paperwork.

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  • Totally agree with some of the comments made.For starters , with regard to 'the reflective discussion' with another trained colleague, most of us ward nurses( constantly understaffed and spread so thinly)are just about managing to provide care for our patients on a daily basis at the cost of our own health and well being with no breaks and inadequate staffing .For years experienced knowledgeable , committed and hardworking nurses have left the ward well after their shift has ended due to the mountainous piles of paperwork which contrary to comments about ' poor time management ' ( try doing this job and see how you fair oh the one in the office doing your audit)it's because there's just so much to do .Many a time I've seen colleagues of mine Inc myself have to use their own free time at home to complete student assessments due to the time constraints on the ward so I think the NMC has really excelled itself this time with the revalidation process .A total pile of @#$/

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  • I've been working in Republic of Ireland last 20 years and have retained my NMC registration. Was hoping to return to UK soon but can't find NMC registrant for reflective discussions. Was told by NMC if registration lapses I would have to complete back to nursing course! I have thirty years nursing experience in total and the NHS is short of nurses, what a joke! I am also registered with Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland as RGN and RPN

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  • I have almost completed my revalidation portfolio. At first, I tried to be positive but now I am almost there, any positivity about this process as long gone. I didn't do anything I don't normally do...ie reflect on my practice/events/CPD. I have always done that - just not put it all down on paper so my line manager can tick some boxes and sign to 'confirm' I have been a good girl and done what the NMC as asked of me. I was thinking my next portfolio will be easier as I will simply document my CPD & reflections as I go along.
    However, after 40 years nursing I am not so sure I want to continue as a nurse - reflection is something the vast majority of nurses do and have done - I was doing this back in the 70's! Enough is enough!

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