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Low systolic BP in heart failure signals increase death risk

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Patients hospitalised with heart failure are more likely to have a poor outcome, including an increased risk of death, if their systolic blood pressure (SBP) is low on admission, a study reports.

Patients hospitalised with heart failure are more likely to have a poor outcome, including an increased risk of death, if their systolic blood pressure (SBP) is low on admission, a study reports.

Results of clinical outcomes taken from 48, 612 patients with heart failure show that those with the lowest SBP of <120 mmHg at admission had a 7.2% increased risk of dying in hospital compared with a 1.7% increased risk in those with a higher SBP of > 161 mmHg.

Lower SBP on admission was also associated with a higher risk of death 60 -90 days after admission, the authors from the Northwestern University of Chicago add.

'This analysis demonstrates that SBP at hospital admission, a readily accessible vital sign, is an important and independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure,' they conclude.

Journal of the American Medical Association (2006) 296: 2217-2226

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