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Major London trust launches ‘nurse in charge’ badges

  • 7 Comments

Patients, visitors and staff at Whipps Cross University Hospital in east London are now able to immediately identify the senior nurse on their ward after the launch of “nurse in charge” badges.

The red badge will be worn by the senior nurse on every shift at the hospital, as part of drive to ensure safe and compassionate care by Barts Health NHS Trust.

“This badge is a quick and simple solution, and is already being welcomed by staff and patients alike”

Andrew Daly

Andy Daly, associate director of nursing (medicine) at Whipps Cross, said: “Patients and visitors told us they didn’t always recognise who was in charge of the ward.

“This badge is a quick and simple solution, and is already being welcomed by staff and patients alike,” he added.

The badges are one of a range of improvements detailed in the trust’s first monthly progress report, which are intended to provide regular updates on its “journey” to improve care.

Barts Health was placed in “special measures” in March on the back of serious concerns identified at Whipps Cross by the Care Quality Commission.

Working closely with clinicians, the trust said it had developed a plan to make lasting improvements to patient care.

It has seven key areas, including making safety an absolute priority at all times, making sure patients get care and treatment in a timely way, and developing appropriate care plans for patients nearing the end of their life.

“I would like to pay tribute to all of our staff who are continuing to prioritise caring for patients every day and night, at a time of great demand on our services”

Alwen Williams

As part of the work Barts Health has trained 40 nurses and doctors to be “safety champions”, was recruiting 500 more nurses and midwives and putting in place “safety huddles” to ensure staff felt confident enough to speak up and act on any concerns.

Trust chief executive Alwen Williams said: “Our patients deserve safe and compassionate care every single time they use our services and our staff deserve to have a positive experience of working here.

“With this plan, I know that we can achieve these improvements,” said Ms Williams. 

She added: “I would like to pay tribute to all of our staff who are continuing to prioritise caring for patients every day and night, at a time of great demand on our services.”

With a turnover of £1.1 bn and a workforce of 14,000, Barts Health is the largest NHS trust in the country.

It has five main sites – St Bartholomew’s Hospital in the City, The Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, Newham University Hospital in Plaistow, Whipps Cross University Hospital in Leytonstone and Mile End.

  • 7 Comments

Readers' comments (7)

  • michael stone

    This caught my eye:

    '... and putting in place “safety huddles” to ensure staff felt confident enough to speak up and act on any concerns.'

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  • How on Earth this organisation could ever have delivered quality care is beyond comprehension if it is 500 nurses short. Shameful!

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  • Good gracious, a badge to show you are different and superior to the rest of your team? Being in charge doesn't necessarily make a better nurse, far from it unfortunately. We always went round and introduced ourselves to patients and were there to support other nurses with their caseload, on top of our own, if they needed it. Such pettiness and obsession with the unimportant is just what is wrong with the current nhs.


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  • Stone - reminiscent of little noddy in toyland and reading everything and believing all he sees in the media. Why not go out into the big wide world and visit it a real hospital with real live patients and workers and learn about the reality!

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  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 4-Nov-2015 9:41 am

    I think the badge indicates who you should raise an issue with, not 'the superiority of the wearer' - rather like 'complain top the CE' if you have trouble with a company.

    Anonymous | 4-Nov-2015 9:48 am

    I think you must have comprehension problems - I've certainly never written anything which suggests that I believe 'all I see in the media'.

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  • Michael stone totally out of touch with reality. When did you ever work on a hospital ward or even have the remotest idea of what nursing entails. Everything you write suggests you have gleaned it from the media without indicating that you make any distinctions between what is reality and what is not. Buzz orf! You have serious cognitive deficits and your comments are not for a professional journal. Go and troll somewhere else.

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  • michael stone

    ANONYMOUS 4 NOVEMBER, 2015 11:38 AM

    I can't figure out, why you think my writings suggest that I am 'media lead' - I'm actually lead by a combination of logic, and my lay perspective.

    I have a tendency, to write things which you won't find in either the media, or in the writings of clinicians, such as:

    http://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h2877/rr-7

    http://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g4094/rr/703333

    As for my inability to make distinctions - well, medics seem unable to make proper distinctions between law and ethics, which is very problematic indeed.

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