Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Manual defibrillation - 1

  • Comment

VOL: 98, ISSUE: 23, PAGE NO: 41

PHIL JEVON, RESUSCITATION OFFICER, MANOR HOSPITAL, WALSALL; CATHERINE BALDOCK, RESUSCITATION OFFICER, WALSGRAVE HOSPITAL, COVENTRY

Sponsored by Pfizer

Defibrillation can be defined as the delivery of an electrical current to the myocardium to terminate ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia.

Defibrillation can be defined as the delivery of an electrical current to the myocardium to terminate ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia.

Ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia are the presenting ECG rhythm in about 30% of patients with cardiac arrests in hospital, with nearly half these patients surviving to discharge (Gwinnutt et al., 2000). The definitive treatment is early defibrillation.

Safety issues relating to defibrillation are highlighted here. It is vital that these are understood and followed.

Care should be taken with patients who have a pacemaker and/or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: the defibrillation electrodes must be positioned 12-15cm from the implants (Resuscitation Council (UK), 2000).

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.