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Midlands nurse faces being struck off for relationship

  • 6 Comments

A Midlands nurse faces being struck off for “breaching a fundamental tenet” of her profession and having sex with a mental health patient in her care.

Wendy McClure, 43, from Blackwell, Bromsgrove, was assigned to the patient when she started a sexual relationship between July and September 2009, a disciplinary hearing was told this week.

She admitted a Nursing and Midwifery Council misconduct charge of having a sexual relationship with a patient while working at Worcestershire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust.

Ms McClure was sacked for gross misconduct in February 2010 following an investigation by the mental health trust. She was reinstated following an appeal, but was handed a final written warning and given a non-medical job that did not involve contact with patients.

Trust bosses are now considering offering her a phased return to medical nursing work, with supervision, the council heard.

Ms McClure, who did not attend the hearing, wrote that her judgement had become clouded owing to stress.

An NMC spokesman said: “The panel is not satisfied that McClure has demonstrated full insight into the seriousness of her misconduct and, in particular, the extent of the damage which her sexual relationship is likely to have inflicted on the vulnerable patient concerned.

“The revelation of her relationship to her employers was only made several weeks after she had received advice from colleagues, in whom she had confided, that her relationship was unprofessional, and only after the patient threatened that he would report her to the trust.”

  • 6 Comments

Readers' comments (6)

  • The patient was in a vulnerable position i assume SVA is in place?

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  • We all know the rules - which are there for a reason - to protect the patient and to be seen to be protecting the patient.

    Nonetheless, if the Nurse now recognises she was in error and safegaurds are in place - it is surely right she be given another chance.

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  • Steve Williams

    Anonymous | 20-Jan-2012 12:22 pm

    'The patient was in a vulnerable position. I assume SVA is in place?'

    Excuse my ignorance - but what is an SVA?

    I am truly asking - not taking the piss.

    and

    Anonymous | 20-Jan-2012 6:55 pm

    "We all know the rules - which are there for a reason - to protect the patient and to be seen to be protecting the patient."

    Yup, those are rules and in basic Registed Mental Nurs. (RMN) training 101. It was reiterated time and time again...

    "It is Okay to feel you have 'empathy' with a patient - perhaps even 'sympathy' with them but never enter into anything which may construed, at best, as a personal relationship, or at worst a sexually intimate one.

    She's 43 - it's not as though she's some timorous wee teenager.

    If she's a 43 year-old RMN then she attended the same sort of lectures that I did in that time-frame.

    This NT article doesn't specify what age the patient was but here's three scenarios for you....

    1) The patient was in his 80's and suffering from early-onset dementia but was worth a fortune?

    2) He was 19 and she was 43!

    3) They were both the same age... but it took her this long to find Mr. Right until they brought him into the locked-ward... but that's OK because she's a trained nurse and she can even do his fortnightly Depot Flupenthixol injections and objectively monitor his mood swings and hallucinations - observe his alcohol intake accurately - and objectively bring all this information back to her colleagues in the weekly Team Meeting?

    Somehow I think - not going to work.

    Maybe it is different in General Nursing... A young handsome 26 year-old male RTA with fractured femur and contusions comes onto orthopedics and is assigned a 25 year-old Barbara Windsor (oooh Matron) Registered Nurse to look after him... they flirt etc... after he is discharged they go out together....

    Nahh... see even that sounds tacky now I come to think about it - although I have known it to happen in the past.

    Best advice is to keep your professional life and your personal life separate....

    Ms McClure got what she deserved. It's a shame to lose all that experience but if she can't act like a professional then she has no place being in the profession!

    Weird, isn't it... Am I sexist? If I were talking about an male RMN I would have finished up by saying "If he can't keep it in his pants and act like a professional then he has no place being in the profession!"

    Perhaps I should have finished by saying "If she can't keep her panties up and act like a professional then she has no place being in the profession!"

    I'm still not sure about that - but either way - you get the general meaning, I hope.

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  • tinkerbell

    “The revelation of her relationship to her employers was only made several weeks after she had received advice from colleagues, in whom she had confided, that her relationship was unprofessional, and only after the patient threatened that he would report her to the trust.”


    I give up. Get me to a nunnery now! Erm, Umm, Urh (or whatever the equivalent in text is for dumbfounded), unbelievable maybe, her colleagues had to point this out to her???

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  • With this type of offence I believe a nurse with a prior unblemished record deserves a second chance - just don't expect a third.

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  • WRONG ! WRONG !WRONG !
    No registered nurse should embark on a relationship with a patient ! ESPECIALLY a registered nurse dealing with patients who are vulnerable and indeed fragile . What if this patient had harmed himself or committed suicide as a consequence of their relationship ????
    He wouldnt have had a second chance would he ?

    She should know better !
    No sympathy I'm afraid .

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