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Nottingham nurse becomes first to receive prestigious clinical lectureship award

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A children’s nurse from Nottingham has become the first in the country to be awarded a prestigious clinical lectureship award from the Department of Health and Social Care.

Joseph Manning, a charge nurse in the paediatric critical care outreach team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, is also the first registered nurse in the East Midlands to be awarded the accolade.

“This lectureship is a tremendous opportunity to develop the evidence base to inform and advance clinical care in this field”

Joseph Manning

As part of the lectureship award, Dr Manning will carry out research to help inform the clinical care of patients and their families across the UK and internationally.

The three-year award is funded and administered by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) and begins on 1 April 2019.

The lectureship will cover research, clinical practice and leadership development, which will include conducting a multi-centre longitudinal study.

The study, also known as the OCEANIC study, will explore the clinical outcomes for children and families after being discharged from a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

Following the study, results will be shared with families, national organisations, NHS commissioners, policy makers and the international paediatric intensive care community.

Joseph Manning

Joseph Manning

Source: NUH

Joseph Manning

Results from the research will help inform the clinical care of patients and their families across the UK and internationally, the trust noted.

Dr Manning, who is also a clinical associate professor in children, young people and families , has worked at the trust for 14 years and said he was committed to achieving “nursing excellence and further improving outcomes for children and young people”.

He said: “I am extremely passionate about improving outcomes and lives for our young patients and their families.”

Dr Manning noted that the current understanding of the needs and the ways in which children and their families who have experienced critical illness are supported, was “limited”.

“This lectureship is a tremendous opportunity to develop the evidence base to inform and advance clinical care in this field, which I hope will have demonstrable impact on the long-term health and wellbeing of children and their families in Nottingham and across the NHS,” he said.

The trust explained that Dr Manning will be supported by a “strong” UK team of clinicians and academics including Professor Jane Coad and Dr Philip Quinlan, both from the University of Nottingham, Professor Elizabeth Draper, from the University of Leicester, and Professor Jos Latour, from the University of Plymouth.

“It is further confirmation of NUH’s commitment to empowering nurses and midwives to strive to achieve care excellence”

Mandie Sunderland

Dr Manning will also be working with national leaders for children and young people healthcare at NHS Improvement on how policies are influenced, developed and implemented.

In addition, he will be invited to work with Professor Martha Curley at the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a global leader for paediatric critical care nursing research.

Mandie Sunderland, chief nurse at Nottingham University Hospitals, said: “This is a fantastic achievement professionally and personally for Joseph, who has a dynamic approach to nursing and is focussed on generating the evidence base that will lead to further improvements in nursing care for children and young people.

“We are extremely proud of his achievement and it is further confirmation of NUH’s commitment to empowering nurses and midwives to strive to achieve care excellence,” she said.

She also highlighted that it was the trust’s ambition to become the first in the country to be “internationally-recognised for excellence in care, through the Magnet accreditation process,” noting that this was “well underway”.

“I look forward to seeing the impact that this opportunity will have for patients and their families during the course of the lectureship and beyond,” she added.

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