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Nurses develop game to help reduce drug errors

  • 10 Comments

A board game, based on drug rounds, has been developed by nurse educators to help frontline healthcare staff to minimise medication errors.

The Drug Round Game, which costs £60, has been created by Focus Games Ltd and City University London.

“The board game helps to practice and refresh skills”

Tia Khan

Karen Rawlings-Anderson and Janet Hunter, both senior lecturers in adult nursing at the university, were behind its development.

The game is a face to face group learning activity where two teams compete to answer questions on a selection of topics.

Subjects dealt with in the game include causes of medication errors, administering medication, medicines management, practical advice to minimise errors, drug calculations and adherence.

The face-to-face nature of the game allows players to share knowledge, experiences and best practice – something not offered by other teaching methods, said the university.

It highlighted that the “collaboration and discussion” aspects were what made the game effective and allowed players to learn.

City University London

Nurses develop game to help reduce drug errors

The Drug Round Game

Professor Stan Newman, dean of the school of health sciences at City, said: “Knowledge about drugs and when and how to use them is critical for patient well-being and safety.

“Developed by staff in the school of health sciences, the Drug Round Game achieves the learning required in an enjoyable yet challenging way for students who end up with the knowledge they need to ensure patient safety,” he said.

Tia Khan, from the research and enterprise department at City, said: “In collaboration with Focus Games, we were pleased to help support and fund novel board games developed by our staff members.

“Their vision was to provide a simple but effective means of supporting front line medical staff with drug calculation and patient safety practice in a fun and safe environment,” she said. “The board game helps to practice and refresh skills.”

  • 10 Comments

Readers' comments (10)

  • michael stone

    I approve of:

    'The face-to-face nature of the game allows players to share knowledge, experiences and best practice'

    'It highlighted [that] the “collaboration and discussion” aspects'

    But I'm not sure this is best done by means of a game - and I'm not sure that nurses would claim to have the time to play such games ?

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  • GAME ? I don't play games and the tried and trusted methods with qualified staff mentoring should be in place as well as following policies and procedures. I have nursed for 35 yrs and have never made a drug error. Why ?..because i followed the protocols-polices and procedures and undertook my annual assessment update

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  • You've NEVER made a drug error in 35 years anonymous???

    A nurse can easily administer 100+ items of medication per shift (often far more) so on this basis, 300-400 items per week which could equate to around 20,000/year. So over a 35 year career, you could have perhaps administered up to 750,000 items and you've really never made an error?

    I'd say it's close to being statistically impossible to carry out even the simplest task that may times without making an occasional error.

    Or perhaps you're just as wonderful, faultless and infallible as you think you are?

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  • michael stone

    BETWEENCLOUDSHADOWS

    I was going to post to 12 AUGUST, 2016 5:55 PM 'you mean you are not aware of ever having made a drug error' which is different from 'I have nursed for 35 yrs and have never made a drug error' - but until I came across your post on similar lines to my thought, I'd decided to not bother [I get enough 'abuse' here on NT as it is !].

    I think the situation must be one of infallibility - I wouldn't dare to suggest it might be a lack of analytical reasoning skills on the part of a nurse.

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  • Stone. Comments like yours are what chase staff away from the NHS.

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  • After 25years of nursing can I say I have never made an error? no I cannot, can I say that I most certainly learnt from this error and never made the same mistake again? emphatically yes! I would also say that subsequently following up with staff on errors my own experience has made me more empathetic to their anxiety. A learning and an open culture ensure patient safety. I have always encouraged nurses to own their errors in the knowledge that we have a learning culture, we should not be judged on the human errors we make but on how we report and action them. A hidden drug error is, after all, much more dangerous than a reported one. Blame culture is what drives people away from the NHS and this arises from perfectionists who are so infallible themselves they cannot accept weakness in others.

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  • michael stone

    ANONYMOUS 16 AUGUST, 2016 3:35 PM

    And there was me thinking it was poor pay, pressure of work, 'unfriendly working hours', absurd behaviour at times from the NMC, etc, that chased staff away.

    17 AUGUST, 2016 10:50 AM has hit the nail on the nail on the head - 'can I say that I most certainly learnt from this error ... I have always encouraged nurses to own their errors in the knowledge that we have a learning culture, we should not be judged on the human errors we make but on how we report and action them. A hidden drug error is, after all, much more dangerous than a reported one'.

    There IS a problem, as that author pointed out, with 'blame culture' driving people away from the NHS - I an definitely not a supporter of blame culture, but if you think you never make any mistakes, your 'mindset' is not open to learning and improving.

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  • 30 plus years of nursing. i have made errors and dealt with them properly. i am still finding lots of errors and again reporting and dealing with them in the correct manner. honesty and transparency is paramount. to err is human.

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  • But do we need a board game to instruct us on how to do a drug round?

    I would say no, just more staff working on the wards to ensure that drug rounds are not undertaken in hurried circumstances. We all know this happens day in and day out.

    Do senior nurses care about this? No.

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  • Uninterepted drug round will be the best way to avoid lot of drug errors
    The above to take place is impossible at all times due to the shortage of staff.

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