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NICE set to approve two drugs for treating eye inflammation

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The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has issued draft guidance recommending two treatments for inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, called the uvea or uveal tract.

NICE has provisionally approved adalimumab (Humira) and dexamethasone (Ozurdex) for treating non-infectious uveitis, which can cause eye pain and can affect vision.

Adalimumab, manufactured by AbbVie, has been provisionally recommended as an option for treating non-infectious uveitis in the posterior segment of the eye in adults.

However, NICE suggested it should only be used if there was active disease, macular oedema, systemic disease – or both eyes were affected – and there had been inadequate response to corticosteroids or immunosuppressants, and there was worsening vision with a risk of blindness.

Meanwhile, dexamethasone intravitreal implant, made by Allergan, has been provisionally recommended as an option for treating non-infectious uveitis in the posterior segment of the eye in adults, only if there is active disease, that is, current inflammation in the eye and macular oedema.

The draft guidance is now out for consultation, and consultees, commentators and interested members of the public are invited to comment.

The closing date for comments is 4 April. Final guidance is expected to be published in July.

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