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Nine in 10 nurses complete revalidation in first phase

  • 12 Comments

Around 35,000 nurses and midwives have completed revalidation in the first three months since it was introduced in April, but more than 3,000 have left the register in that time, data from the Nursing and Midwifery Council has shown.

The NMC said its data showed that the introduction of revalidation – which requires nurses to meet a number of new requirements every three years to renew their registration – was not having an adverse effect on the size of the nursing workforce, contrary to suggestions raised by some before the system came in.

“This [data] demonstrates that nurses and midwives across the four countries are embracing revalidation”

Jackie Smith

The regulator also said the data showed renewal rates were “in line with expectations” based on normal trends, with 91% of the 38,700 people due to revalidate in April, May and June having done so.

A total of 3,616 registrants did not revalidate, including around 3,341 who are no longer on the register, according to the data contained in an NMC report published today.

Meanwhile, just under 300 people are still waiting for their revalidation application to be processed – due to reasons including their documentation being verified, a declaration of a conviction, or being subject to a fitness to practise complaint.

Commenting on today’s data, NMC chief executive and registrar Jackie Smith said: “This demonstrates that nurses and midwives across the four countries are embracing revalidation. Feedback so far is overwhelmingly positive.”

Earlier this year the regulator analysed data on historical trends, which led it to estimate that between 6,600 and 7,300 nurses and midwives would leave the register between April and the end of May due to reasons including retirement. This did not take into account the effect of revalidation.

Concerns have previously been raised that the number of new requirements that registrants now have to meet – compared with the previous post-registration education and practice (PREP) standards – would be off-putting for some nurses who would choose not to revalidate as a result.

Information released today shows that of the 3,341 people whose registration lapsed, the vast majority were based in England (2,324) followed by those in Scotland (292), in Wales (146) and in Northern Ireland (100). The figures represent around a 7% to 9% drop-off compared to the number due to revalidate.

A total of 479 nurse and midwives practising outside the UK left the register out of the 1,085 who were due to revalidate, representing a 44% reduction.

Jackie Smith

Jackie Smith

Jackie Smith

The NMC said it was unable to provide information on the spot checks it was carrying out on revalidation portfolios, because the process took several weeks and many registrants would not have completed it yet.

It said it would report back on this process of verification in annual reports it intends to produce, including the number of people selected for checking, plus whether they were able to stay on the register or not as a result.

Future annual reports will also include more detailed information, such as registrants’ scope of practice, reasons for lapsing their registration, their work setting, types of confirmers – who have signed off their revalidation requirements – and whether they receive regular appraisals.

More on NMC revalidation

  • 12 Comments

Readers' comments (12)

  • Amazing how 'spin' can make this sound a positive result! Constantly we hear that there are a shortage of Nurses, and now 10% of Nurses not revalidating in the FIRST wave is a positive result!

    10% drop in Nursing workforce will only serve to increase the issues of understaffing we already have,

    I for one won't be revalidating either, time for me to bow out of the bureaucracy!

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  • That 10% drop was my first thought too, Ian, but what we would need to see is the normal percentage not renewing to make a realistic assessment of the scale of that loss. In employers who have committed to supporting nurses the process (I am fortunate to have seen a positive approach in mine) nurses can report greater ease in revalidation than they had feared, but where investment in support is lacking it falls on the registrant alone. I agree that any drop in nurses makes our current problem worse, and a further point of interest will be the number of failed attempts to revalidate. Quite how effective this is in protecting the public is something which will take a long time to emerge, and may be obscured altogether by the growing crisis in recruiting and retaining an adequate nursing workforce.

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  • Well, I won't be revalidating next year. At last, after 37 years in the NHS I have finally taken early retirement. Good luck to all practising nurses. I couldn't physically and mentally manage any longer.

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  • Yeah? Well I should it is flawed!
    Why?
    A colleague managed to revalidate without doing the "work", as his other colleague gave her details (nmc pin and all) & Viola.....There he went. Typed her details and clicked!

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  • I did everything right - prepared all the information on the forms provided and ensured I satisfied all requirements. Then I had the pleasure over a period of six weeks, of emailing, phoning and making face to face requests for an interview with my line manager. The line manager eventually turned up in the middle of a shift and said "right let's get it done" - no notice but fortunately I have the paperwork - not interested and didn't even check it - then went away saying I would received their PIN in an email as LM hadn't brought it. Day before expiry - I gave up and arranged a further interview with a colleague - talk about panic. Line manager's response - "well you're not one of us" (I work as a bank nurse). It's alright expecting line managers to jump to it but we don't all have great line managers who are reliable.

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  • Another paper chase, wish i could retire from this poxy job.

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  • Not interested to be a Nurse anymore

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  • A ten percent drop is not a success rate to be proud of

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  • I don't think that the revalidation is fit for purpose. As an occupational health nurse I have to complete something that is not really relevant to my job. My skills are in no way the same as those of a nurse on the wards. How can completing return to works be measured, or talking to someone about their MH issues, or completing mandatory testing? Not only that but I work alone so apart from the person attending no one can verify my work. I think OH should be taken out of this process and another way found of measuring our skill set. I am not looking forward to completing this process when it's my turn. Not only that is there enough OH experience within the NMC to measure the validity of my work? I'm yet to be convinced this is the way forward.

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  • Not only is revalidation a headache, It has been recently reported in the press that some students have cheated when submitting degree work.
    A recently qualified RGN asked me to shadow her as she had never given an IM injection! How does this example prepare the recently qualifed nurse for practice? It is unfair to the nurse and patients. I trained in 1972 and qualified as an SRN, Midwife and Distirct Nurse; I also worked for four years as a sister in A&E. Expereince and working on the job gave me the skill set to be a competent practitioner. During our training we also had frequent academic tuturiols related to the particular area of practice we were due to commence. Yearly written and practical hospital exams meant you could not progress in the profession if these were not passed. Also, the old SEN, now the new ?associate nurse were invaluable in the work place. Please don't say that us older nurses were only task orientated, it is an insult. Reflection has always been part of good practice, it is integral and shouldn't need to be a paper exercise.

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