Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Best and worst performing trusts in the NHS staff survey

  • Comment

The annual NHS survey has shown staff continue to believe the care their trusts provide is safe, with 69% saying they would recommend care at their organisation to a friend or relative.

The 2016 survey results, released yesterday, are almost unchanged from 2015, in terms of how NHS staff perceived standards of care at their place of work.

In 2015, 69% of staff agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: “If a friend or relative needed treatment I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation.”

However, there is significant variation in staff responses at trust level. Three mental health trusts were the worst performers on this statement when the total staff agreeing or strongly agreeing were added up.

Manchester Mental Health and Social Care NHS Trust had the lowest score in the country, with only 45% of staff recommending it. However, this was a significant increase 32% in 2015.

A spokesman for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust (GMW), which took over Manchester Health and Social Care NHS Trust (MMHSC) at the start of 2017, did not comment on what accounted for the trust’s low score.

However, he said that the trust was aware, from speaking to staff and from previous staff surveys, that the “workforce within the former MMHSC services had several concerns that needed addressing”.

“We have listened to those issues and have just started embarking on a programme to improve services in Manchester, and this is supported by all stakeholders and will involve staff throughout,” he said in a statement.

“GMW has a strong track record of staff engagement (as recorded in this survey) and this is continuing within the new trust,” he said.

He added: “GMMH is very proud to see the results from this same survey show 71% of GMW staff said, ’If a friend or relative needed treatment, I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation’. We are now working to achieve similarly positive results across the entire trust.”

Another low-scoring mental health trust that is also headed for merger, North Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, said its score reflected finance and staffing problems.

A spokesman for North Essex Partnership said: “These results send a clear message from our staff that they are working under the extreme pressure but remain totally focused on delivering the highest quality care for our patients in challenging circumstances, including local and national staff shortages and also financial pressures.

“The survey illustrates the urgent need to create a new future for services with the planned merger between ourselves and the South Essex Partnership University Foundation Trust,” he said. “Both organisations firmly believe the merger will bring greater stability to secondary mental health services in Essex, release more money for front line services, improve recruitment, and enable us to improve services to our patients.

“An organisational development programme is already being planned for the new trust to ensure that all staff within the new organisation are fully engaged and involved, and their views are not just heard but fully considered within the decision making processes,” he added.

The biggest year-on-year decrease was at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, which saw the number of staff agreeing with the statement falling from 72% to 65%.

Emergency care practitioners were the professional group least likely to agree with the statement. The worst performing provider on this measure was the Isle of Wight NHS Trust’s ambulance service, with just 45% of those staff agreeing.

Of the 10 worst perfmorming acute trusts, four are also in special measures – Walsall, North Cumbria, Worcestershire Acute, and Brighton and Sussex.

Specialist trusts dominated the top 10 best performers, with only one non-specialist – Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Foundation Trust – among them. The best performing acute trusts tended to be members of the Shelford Group or in the South of the country.

Ten worst performing trusts against the statement: “If a friend or relative needed treatment I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation”:

  • Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust – 45% of staff agreed or strongly agreed

    Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

    Good practice highlighted at Greater Manchester mental health trust

  • North Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust – 45%
  • Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust – 48%
  • Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust – 48%
  • North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust – 49%
  • Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust – 49%
  • Isle of Wight NHS Trust (acute sector) – 49%
  • North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust – 51%
  • Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust – 52%
  • Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – 52%

Ten worst performing acute trusts against the statement: “If a friend or relative needed treatment I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation”

  • Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust – 48% of staff agreed or strongly agree

    Enter image title

  • North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust – 49%
  • Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust – 49%
  • North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust – 51%
  • Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust – 52%
  • Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – 52%
  • Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust – 54%
  • Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust – 55%
  • Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust – 55%
  • Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – 56%

Ten best performing acute trusts against the statement: “If a friend or relative needed treatment I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation”

  • Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – 95% of staff agreed or strongly agreed

    Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital

    Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital

  • The Christie NHS Foundation Trust – 93%
  • The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust – 93%
  • The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – 93%
  • The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust – 92%
  • Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – 91%
  • Queen Victoria Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – 91%
  • The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust – 91%
  • Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust – 90%
  • Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust – 90%

Ten best performing non-specialist trusts against the statement: “If a friend or relative needed treatment I would be happy with the standard of care provided by this organisation”

  • Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – 91% of staff agreed or strongly agreed

    Newcastle upon Tyne

    Newcastle set to get first dementia specialist nurse post

  • Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust – 89%
  • Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust – 85%
  • Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust – 84%
  • University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – 84%
  • Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – 84%
  • Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust – 83%
  • Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – 83%
  • Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – 82%
  • University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust – 82%

 

 

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.

Related Jobs