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Nurses and midwives recognised for contribution to healthcare in 2019 honours list

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New year honours have been awarded to nearly 30 members of the nursing and midwifery profession for 2019, including the outgoing chief nursing officer for England, a leading voice in community nursing and a senior nurse credited with helping turn round a trust in the wake of a high-profile maternity scandal.

Professor Jane Cummings, who is set to stand down soon as CNO, was one of three members of the two professions who received a CBE in this year’s honours list for her services to nursing and the NHS, including the introduction of the “6Cs”.

She was appointed as CNO for England in March 2012, after holding a number of senior roles in the North of England. In December that year she oversaw the publishing of the Compassion in Practice national nursing strategy, which incorporated the “6Cs” of nursing.

In 2016, she went on to develop its successor Leading Change, Adding Value, which is the current national framework for nursing, midwifery and care staff.

Speaking about her CBE, Professor Cummings said: “It is a huge privilege to be recognised in the new year’s honours list and great to see that our professions are leading the way this year.

“I am incredibly proud of what nurses and midwives have achieved over the last 12 months despite the challenges they face, and the awards they have received are well deserved and should rightly be celebrated,” she added.

“It is a huge privilege to be recognised in the new year’s honours list”

Jane Cummings

Nursing CBEs also went to Michelle McLoughlin, chief nursing officer at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, and Claire Murdoch, currently national director for mental health at NHS England and chief executive of Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust.

Another nurse turned-manager mentioned in the list is Marianne Griffiths, currently chief executive of Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, who has been made a Dame Commander.

Meanwhile, Ms McLoughlin was described as an “integral part” of the team that helped Birmingham Children’s Hospital achieve an “outstanding” rating from the CQC in 2017. In the same year she also took on the chief nurse role at Birmingham Women’s Hospital following its merger with the Children’s Hospital.

Talking about her award, she said: “Like most people, I was very surprised when I received the news and completely humbled by it. It’s just not something that you ever expect.”

Marianne Griffiths

Marianne Griffiths

Marianne Griffiths

Ms Mcloughlin was appointed as chief nurse for Birmingham Children’s Hospital in 2007 where she oversees the day-to-day care provided at the specialist paediatric hospital.

She added: “I’m lucky to have had so many role models, a supportive family and many dedicated colleagues, past and present. Without them, I simply could not have achieved this and I mean that from the bottom of my heart.

“Every day I’m thankful for being so lucky to have a chance to make a difference,” she said. “Nursing has given me that opportunity and it’s why I think it’s the best job in the world.”

Among the six nursing recipients of an OBE was Dr David Foster, a former deputy CNO for England and currently a trustee at the charity the Queen’s Nursing Institute, who was commended for his services to nursing and midwifery.

Dr Foster, who previously worked as the head of the nursing, midwifery allied health professions policy unit as well as deputy chief nursing officer at the Department of Health, said he felt “honoured and thrilled” to receive his OBE.

He added: “It is especially touching because I will have been nominated and supported by my colleagues in both nursing and midwifery. I am also pleased it is an endorsement of my commitment to being a charity trustee.”

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

Sue Smith

Sue Smith

Also receiving an OBE was Sue Smith, executive chief nurse and deputy chief executive at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, given for her services to the NHS and patient safety.

The trust said Ms Smith was a “key member of the team”, which she helped lead to improvement following the high profile maternity scandal there that involved the deaths of mothers and babies at Furness General Hospital.

Ms Smith helped transform the trust from a Care Quality Commission rating of “inadequate” to “good”.

She said she was “delighted and overwhelmed” to receive her honour but added that “nobody in the NHS can deliver anything in isolation”.

”It is absolutely dependent on people listening to and working with each other in order to get things right. I would not be in the position to receive this honour if it was not for the amazing people that I work with,” she said. ”That is also true of the other organisations I work with. It is always all about the team.”

In addition, OBEs were awarded to Professor Brian Dolan, visiting professor of nursing at the Oxford Institute for Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Research, Joy Ongcachuy, a theatre sister at Barts Health NHS Trust, and Emma Senyard, associate director of nursing for surgery at the same trust.

Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Richard Parker

Richard Parker vaccinating staff against the flu

Chief executive of Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals, Richard Parker, who originally trained as a general nurse before turning to management in the NHS, was also awarded an OBE for his services to “sustainable care”.

Mr Parker said he was “truly humbled” to have been appointed OBE. “Throughout my career within the NHS I have worked with extraordinarily talented individuals, who have used their talents to the benefit of countless patients,” he added.

“To have been able to contribute to improving the delivery of care throughout my career has been an utter privilege and as such I am extremely grateful to receive such recognition,” he said.

The new year honours also saw 12 other healthcare professionals pick up an MBE, including Ruth Oshikanlu, who is an ambassador for the health visiting profession. Specifically, Ms Oshinkanlu was awarded for her services to community nursing for children and families.

An MBE also goes to Angela Thompson who recently retired from NHS Improvement’s nursing team in London.

She said: “I am honoured and delighted to have been nominated for an MBE for services to nursing and healthcare leadership. I have enjoyed a career of 35 years in the NHS and will continue to promote nursing as a career as well as care that is of the highest standard for patients.

“I have always promoted the specific needs of patients with learning disabilities and their families when receiving care in hospital,” she said. ”I will continue to promote best practice for these patients so that they get the care and experience they deserve, supported through evidence-based research.”

In light of the honours, Dame Donna Kinnair, acting chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said: “It’s wonderful news that so many nurses have been recognised in the New Year’s Honours.”

“I send my warmest congratulations to all the recipients”

Donna Kinnair

Dame Donna said she was particularly pleased to see Professor Cummings’ recognition as she described the outgoing CNO had “worked so tirelessly to promote nursing in the government”.

“Nurses are the biggest staff group in the NHS, and constantly go the extra mile to give the best possible care for their patients,” she said. “They don’t do this in the hope of attracting plaudits, but I’m sure they will be pleased to receive this important public recognition.”

She added: “I send my warmest congratulations to all the recipients.”

Full list of nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants included in the latest honours list: 

Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE)

Michelle Ann Bolger (Michelle McLoughlin), chief nursing officer, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust. For services to Paediatric Nursing and to Patient Safety. (Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands)

NHS England/NHs London

England’s chief nurse to oversee health service in the capital

Jane Cummings

Professor Jane Frances Cummings, chief nursing officer for England and Regional director London NHS England. For services to Nursing and the NHS. (Ascot, Berkshire)

Claire Louise Murdoch. National director for Mental Health National Health Service England and, chief executive, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust. For services to the NHS. (London)

Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE)

Professor Brian William Dolan, visiting professor of Nursing Oxford Institute for Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Research. For services to Nursing and to Emergency Care. (Warwickshire)

david foster

david foster

David Foster

Dr David William Foster, trustee The Queen’s Nursing Institute. For services to Nursing and to Midwifery. (London)

Joy Montalba Ongcachuy, theatre sister Barts Health NHS Trust. For services to Healthcare. (London)

Emma Jane Senyard, associate director of Nursing for Surgery at Barts Health NHS Trust. For services to healthcare. (London)

Susan Lorraine Smith, executive chief nurse University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust. For services to the NHS and to patient safety. (Morecambe, Lancashire)

Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE)

Patricia Diane Armstrong-Child, director of Nursing Bolton NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing. (St Helens, Merseyside)

Zoe Alexandra Boreland. Formerly head of midwifery. South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust. For services to midwifery. (Down)

Nt editorial ruth oshikanlu

Nt editorial ruth oshikanlu

Ruth Oshikanlu

Rebecca Emily Chester, consultant nurse and chair of the National Learning Disability Consultant Nurse Network, Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust. For services to people with learning disabilities. (Alton, Hampshire)

Melanie Louise Davies, sister Morriston Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board. For services to patients with learning disabilities. (Neath, Neath Port Talbot)

Andrew John Gritt, formerly Service and clinical lead Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing and to Mental Health. (Bournemouth, Dorset)

Maureen Horton, community staff nurse Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing and to the NHS. (Sheffield, South Yorkshire)

Margaret Kitching, chief nurse North Region, NHS England. For services to nursing. (Barnsley, South Yorkshire)

Imelda Mary McGucken, director CHARIS Cancer Centre. For services to nursing and to palliative care in Northern Ireland. (Cookstown, Tyrone)

Queen's Nursing Institute

Wendy Nicholson

Wendy Nicholson

Wendy Jane Nicholson, national lead nurse for children young people and families, Public Health England. For services to nursing for children and young people. (Market Drayton, Shropshire)

Ruth Oluwatosin Oshikanlu, ambassador for the health visiting profession. For services to community nursing children and families. (London)

Gail Elizabeth Powell, senior nurse and professional lead for health visiting Aneurin Bevan Local Health Board. For services to health visiting. (Blackwood, Caerphilly)

Angela Thompson, director of nursing and deputy regional chief nurse London, NHS Improvement. For services to nursing and to healthcare leadership. (Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire)

 

British Empire Medal (BEM)

Elizabeth Helen Bainbridge, consultant nurse Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing and to vulnerable people. (Gainsborough, Lincolnshire)

Kathleen Mary Dawson, specialist nurse County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing. (Carlisle, Cumbria)

Jennifer Ann Ladd, emergency nurse practitioner Minor Injury Unit, Cardigan Hospital. For services to the Ceredigion and Hywel Dda University Health Board. (Llangoedmor, Ceredigion)

Janine Margaret McKnight-Cowan, formerly Queen’s Nurse Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust. For services to nursing. (Swadlincote, Derbyshire)

Anne Brown Russell, formerly chair Sheffield Health Action Resource for Ethiopia. For services to nursing and to health leadership in Ethiopia. (Edinburgh)

Clare Maria Warnock, practice development sister Weston Park Cancer Centre, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. For services to Cancer Research and to cancer patients. (Sheffield, South Yorkshire)

Royal Red Cross

As an Ordinary Member of the Royal Red Cross, First Class

Lt Col Jayne Elizabeth Cumming. Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps

As an Ordinary Associate of the Royal Red Cross, Second Class

Sgt Colodia Sukali Muzvidziwa. Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps

Nurses and midwwives given awards in previous years:

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