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HEE chief nurse to lead Nursing Now leadership programme

  • 4 Comments

Health Education England’s chief nurse, Professor Lisa Bayliss-Pratt, has been appointed at global campaign, Nursing Now, to help spearhead a leadership and development training programme for young nurses and midwives in 2020.

Professor Bayliss-Pratt will be working for the Nursing Now campaign, a collaboration between the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses, as the new programme lead for “influential leadership for policy”.

“We want to see more nurses in senior leadership roles where their voices can be heard” 

Lisa Bayliss Pratt

In her new role, Professor Bayliss-Pratt will lead the campaign’s leadership training initiative, coined the Nightingale Challenge, which aims to promote investment in nursing and ensure more nurses and midwives are put in senior leadership positions.

As part of this, she will work to encourage employers around the world to provide leadership and development training for young nurses and midwives.

Speaking about her appointment, Professor Bayliss-Pratt said: “I am extremely honoured to have been appointed to this key role – it’s a privilege to be involved in such an exciting and important initiative.

“Promoting nursing and midwifery is vital to the future of healthcare, not just here in the UK but across the world,” she said.

“Effective and improved healthcare is delivered by multi-disciplinary teams and nurses and midwives can and should play an increasingly influential role in these teams,” she added.

The leadership programme, which will coincide with the World Health Organization’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife, will play a “key role” in Nursing Now’s ambition to raise the status and profile of the profession.

The campaign’s aim is to have at least 20,000 nurses and midwives aged 35 and under benefitting from the initiative, with at least 1,000 employers signing up to the challenge.

Commenting on the Nightingale Challenge, Professor Bayliss-Pratt said: “And, of course, we want to see more nurses in senior leadership roles, where their voices can be heard and they can bring their perspectives and advocacy to policy making nationally and globally.

“The Nightingale Challenge, by encouraging investment in education and development, will help make this a reality and I’m looking forward to seeing this take shape over the coming months,” she added.

According to Nursing Now, the challenge will give nurses and midwives the opportunity to extend their knowledge, skills and leadership potential, and develop their professional networks locally, nationally and internationally.

It will also place healthcare professionals in a “strong position” to take the next step in their careers, it noted.

Professor Bayliss-Pratt will officially launch the challenge at the ICN World Congress in Singapore later this month.

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • How is this going to help to make the slightest dent in the 40,000 nurses that are required in our profession.

    Fiddling whilst Rome burns and paying those in the orchestra too much money.

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  • According to Nursing Now, the challenge will give nurses and midwives the opportunity to extend their knowledge, skills and leadership potential, and develop their professional networks locally, nationally and internationally.
    PLEASE engage us all ... hospice,private , prisons , mental health armed forces and care home colleagues ..

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  • This according to Nursing Now

    "Employers are welcome to involve other age groups and other professionals in their programmes as well – but only nurses and midwives aged 35 and under will count towards the 20,000 goal"

    Why no over 35's?

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  • I am somewhat baffled by this arbitrary age limit of 35 and under considering nurses are now required to work to their state pension age of at least 67 years! There are many over 35's who already possess the knowledge, skills, confidence and academic fortitude to lead but are overlooked and forgotten. We repeatedly speak of minimising health inequalities but when will inequalities end for those at the forefront of nursing????

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