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Morecambe Bay nurse set to retire after 50 years of service to local cancer patients

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An oncology nurse, described as an “expert” in placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines and as “key” in helping set up a new hospital unit, is to retire after five decades.

Janet Rigg, a nurse and clinical leader in the oncology units at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust will hang up her uniform for the last time at the end of the year.

“I think it is time to take a back seat and let the younger ones continue their good work”

Janet Rigg

Ms Rigg was presented with gifts and a long-service certificate at a retirement celebration on 22 December surrounded by friends, family and colleagues.

Her career started in 1968 at Lancaster’s Beaumont Hospital, where she trained and worked for 22 years. When the hospital closed in 1990, she transferred to Queen Victoria Hospital in Morecambe and worked as a nurse on the ear, nose and throat and urology wards.

In 1994, Ms Rigg transferred again, this time to the Royal Lancaster Infirmary where she worked night duty on the surgical and medical wards.

In 2000, she began working on the oncology unit at the infirmary where, over the years, she has cared for over 60,000 patients who have received chemotherapy and associated treatments.

The trust said she was “pivotal” in the opening of the Grizedale Unit Westmorland General Hospital (WGH) in 2011.

“Janet is an amazing, inspirational and truly wonderful nurse – all seeing, all knowing and definitely wise”

Sue Procter

Ms Rigg said: “I will miss working very much, and mostly I will miss the camaraderie of the staff, and especially the patients who are always so grateful for all we do.

“I would like to thank colleagues Alison Scott and Courtney Spinks who have both been a great influence and support to me in my oncology career,” she said.

She added: “I do feel very sad and think I could have worked a lot longer, however things have changed so much in the NHS I think it is time to take a back seat and let the younger ones continue their good work.”

Sue Procter, sister and unit manager for oncology at the trust, said: “Janet is an amazing, inspirational and truly wonderful nurse – all seeing, all knowing and definitely wise.

“Janet is an expert peripherally inserted central catheter line placer and has always embraced new challenges with good humour and professionalism,” she noted.

“Janet has also been key in the successful set up and continued management of the Grizedale unit at WGH and will I know be sadly missed by patients and colleagues alike,” said Ms Procter.

She added: “On a personal note Janet has always been extremely kind and supportive to me during my time on the unit, offering much needed information and advice regarding all things oncology and chemotherapy related.”

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

Tribute paid to oncology nurse retiring after 50 years service

Janet Rigg receives her certificate

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

Tribute paid to oncology nurse retiring after 50 years service

Lyn Lawrenson, Janet Rigg and Sue Procter

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

Tribute paid to oncology nurse retiring after 50 years service

Janet Rigg and her team

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